Thursday, August 21, 2014

Findmypast launches ‘Hall of Heroes’ to celebrate the heroes in everyone’s family



  • Findmypast.com launches ‘Hall of Heroes’ campaign to share individual stories about heroic figures from everyone’s own family history
  • Call for people to submit stories of their own family heroes to be included alongside famous historical figures
  • New record sets launched to help people discover the heroes in their family


London, UK, 19 August, 2014 – Leading family history website, Findmypast.com has today announced the launch of its Hall of Heroes. The Hall aims to celebrate the heroes from our history, from unsung underdogs to First World War medal winners.

Findmypast is asking people to help create a ‘Hall of Heroes’ that truly reflects the heroic figures from our own history by inviting everyone to submit their own heroes from their family history to be chosen for inclusion in the Hall of Heroes.

Unsung underdogs to military heroes

The Hall aims to celebrate the actions of all types of heroes, including men, women, children and animals.

Notable stories include Salem Poor (1747-1802), who was an African-American slave who bought his freedom, joined the army, and became a hero of the Revolutionary War. His gallantry during the Battle of Bunker Hill so impressed his fellow soldiers that they petitioned the General Court of Massachusetts on his behalf. Poor was commemorated with a stamp as part of the United States Bicentennial in 1975. Poor Street in Andover is named after him.

Another hero celebrated by Findmypast today is Sergeant Alvin Cullum York, one of the most decorated American soldiers in World War I. Alvin won the Medal of Honor, Distinguished Service Cross. Legion of Honour, Croix de Guerre, War Merit Cross, and Order of Prince Danilo I for his service in France. York endeavoured to live a relatively quiet life after the war, shunning opportunities to cash in on his new fame. In the twenties he founded the Alvin C. York Foundation, aiming to increase education opportunities in his home state of Tennessee.

“It’s great to be able to celebrate the bravery and courage of figures in our history. The ‘Hall of Heroes’ allows the lives of well documented famous figures to be recognised alongside the bravery of the everyman, including maids, miners and even rescue dogs,” said Holly Thomas, historian and writer at Findmypast. “These people, drawn from all walks of life, and from all over the world, played an incredibly important part in shaping our history. We’re especially excited about reading the stories of the heroes that people will be submitting from their own families over the coming weeks and can’t wait to make these unknown stories available for everyone to read in one place for the very first time.”

Visit heroes.findmypast.com for more information on these heroes and to submit your own story.

About Findmypast

Findmypast has been a leading family history website for more than 10 years. It’s a searchable online archive of over 1.8 billion family history records, from parish records and censuses to migration records, military collections, historical newspapers and lots more. For our members around the world, Findmypast is a crucial resource for building family trees and doing detailed historical research.

In April 2003 the company was the first to provide access to the complete birth, marriage, and death indexes for England & Wales, winning the Queen’s Award for Innovation. Since that time, Findmypast has digitised family history records from across the globe, including major collections from Britain, Ireland, Australia, and the United States. In partnership with the British Library, Findmypast is part of a project to safeguard the future of the world’s greatest newspaper archive – allowing digital access to more than 40 million newspaper pages. Recently, The National Archives awarded the company the exclusive rights to put the 1939 Register for England and Wales online.

www.findmypast.com

Saturday, August 16, 2014

2014 FGS Conference Online Registration Ends August 19

Federation of Genealogical Societies 2014 Conference


“Gone to Texas” – A Conference for the Nation’s Genealogists

August 15, 2014 – Austin, TX. Online registration for the 2014 Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS) Conference, scheduled 27-30 August 2014 in San Antonio, Texas, ends Tuesday, August 19. Register at http://www.fgsconference.org/registration. This year’s conference theme is “Gone to Texas,” and the local hosts are the San Antonio Genealogical and Historical Society (SAGHS) and the Texas State Genealogical Society (TSGS).

Pre-registering for the conference gives you access to some great benefits. Those who have already registered for the conference still have time to purchase tickets to the conference "extras."
Only attendees who preregister for the conference can:

  • Access the conference syllabus online prior to the conference.
  • Guarantee a spot in the "extra" conference events (on-site tickets may be available to events if they have not sold out):
  • 13 luncheons over the 4 conference days.
  • 10 workshops over 3 days. Workshops are filling up quickly but there are still a few spaces remaining.
  • Wednesday Night at the Institute of Texan Cultures on August 27, hosted by the the San Antonio Genealogical and Historical Society and the Texas State Genealogical Society.

Friday evening’s “Night in Old San Antonio” at La Villita is sold out.

You can also purchase extra tickets (except for workshops) for your non-genealogy spouses or friends who traveled with you to the conference.

Visit https://www.fgsconference.org/registration/ to register or add "extras" today. We hope to see you in San Antonio, August 27-30.

Learn More about FGS 2014 and Stay Connected
About the Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS)

The Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS) was founded in 1976 and represents the members of hundreds of genealogical societies. FGS links the genealogical community by helping genealogical societies strengthen and grow through resources available online, FGS FORUM magazine (filled with articles for the family history community), and Society Strategy Series papers, covering topics about effectively operating a genealogical society. FGS also links the genealogical community through its annual conference — four days of excellent lectures, including one full day devoted to society management topics. To learn more visit http://www.fgs.org.

Follow us on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/FGSgenealogy), Twitter (http://www.facebook.com/FGSgenealogy) and on our blog at (http://voice.fgs.org).

Tuesday, August 12, 2014

Registration for 2015 Forensic Genealogy Institute Opens September 9, 2014

FGI Offers Two Brand-New, Cutting-Edge Courses for Forensic Genealogists


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – Dallas, Texas – August 12, 2014 – Registration for the fourth annual Forensic Genealogy Institute (FGI) will open on September 9, 2014, at 1 pm EST. The educational arm of the Council for the Advancement of Forensic Genealogy (CAFG), FGI will be held March 26-28, 2015, at the Wyndham Love Field Hotel in Dallas, Texas.

The 2015 FGI features two brand-new, concurrent courses:

  • Forensic Genealogy Master Practicum
  • Advanced Genetic Genealogy and Unknown-Parentage Cases

Registration for each course is $445, which includes 20 hours of instruction by expert forensic and genetic genealogists in just three days, minimizing travels costs and time away from family and work. Enrollment is limited, so early registration is encouraged.

“In keeping with CAFG’s goals to promote and maintain high standards of professionalism, the fourth FGI enlarges and expands upon the curriculum offered at the previous institutes,” said Leslie Brinkley Lawson, CAFG President. “The 2015 program offers must-have education, training, mentoring, and professional development to those thinking of careers in forensic or genetic genealogy.

The “Forensic Genealogy Master Practicum” provides hands-on experience in researching various types of forensic cases, working with clients (including interviews and contracts), writing forensic reports or affidavits (students will write three reports), and participating in or observing a mock trial to defend a forensic report. Enrollment is limited to 40 students.

The “Advanced Genetic Genealogy and Unknown-Parentage Cases” course applies DNA and traditional genealogical research to uncovering the genetic heritage of individuals with unknown parentage. This area of forensic research is expanding rapidly, and genealogists who can use DNA to successfully address unknown-parentage cases are in great demand. Enrollment is limited to 60 students.
For full details of each course’s curriculum, as well as faculty biographies, visit www.forensicgenealogists.org/institute.


About CAFG

Established in 2011, the Council for the Advancement of Forensic Genealogy (CAFG) is a business league with a professional membership dedicated to the advancement of forensic genealogy, which is research, analysis, and reporting in cases with legal implications. CAFG promotes high standards of professional and ethical conduct, provides education and training opportunities, and assists in professional development though mentorship, full membership, credentialing, and awarding of fellowships. Learn more at www.forensicgenealogists.org.

Sunday, August 10, 2014

International Tracing Service Chief to Speak in SLC on Wednesday free, open to the public


Diane Afoumado, PhD., Chief, International Tracing Service (ITS) Research Branch, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum will be speaking on the records and the services offered by the ITS on Wednesday, August 13, 2014 at 7:00 pm at the Plaza Hotel in downtown Salt Lake City. Held in conjunction with the Eastern European Family History Conference sponsored by the Foundation for East European Family History Studies (FEEFHS), the presentation is open to the public and free to attend.

While the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum (USHMM) in Washington, DC, is the United States’ repository for the International Tracing Service (ITS) collection, the records will be of interest to anyone with ancestors who may have been persecuted or displaced during WWII. Afoumado reports that the ITS collection “contains diverse information about the persecution and murder of (both) Jews and non-Jews—Poles, Ukrainians, Lithuanians, Latvians, Estonians, Soviet prisoners of war, Roma and Sinti, homosexuals, Jehovah’s Witnesses, and persons with disabilities—under Nazi rule.”
Documents such as camp arrival lists, grave locations, transport lists, prisoner cards, forced labor lists, death lists, displaced person applications for assistance, deportation lists, emigration applications or questionnaires, registration and work cards, sometimes with photographs, are contained in the collection. Research services to access those records are provided by ITS to the public at no charge. Afoumado says the collection contains “several millions of documents,” saved by the Holocaust Survivors and Victims’ Resource Center to ensure “that the individual experiences of survivors and victims of the Holocaust and Nazi-era persecution are collected, preserved and disseminated for future generations.

Ms. Afoumado will be available on Thursday following the presentation to begin the research process with those interested, according to Peg Ivanyo, FEEFHS conference chair. “The ITS Research Branch has dedicated both funding and personnel to bring this wonderful service to our conference, and we wish to share it broadly with the community to the extent possible,” Ivanyo says. Anyone may attend the Wednesday evening presentation and subsequently set up an appointment to meet with Ms. Afoumado or complete the paperwork for her to begin the process of searching the records database at a later time.

Additional information about the FEEFHS conference and other services is available at feefhs.org.