Tuesday, July 19, 2011

Genealogist Madaleine J. Laird accepts permanent position as copy editor for Casefile Clues.

For Immediate Release

July 17, 2011 - Rio, Illinois: Madaleine J. Laird once served in the United States Air Force as an Arabic cryptologic linguist, but to paraphrase Forrest Gump, that's all she has to say about that. Her favorite civilian 9-to-5 jobs were at public and academic libraries, where she worked on the "front lines" at the circulation desk and in the trenches in technical services. She has written margin features for lower-division college textbooks, biographical profiles for a book on Irish American history, reviews of romance novels for a national magazine, and dozens of how-to articles on everything from household appliances to genealogical research. Madaleine has also spoken to genealogical societies about library research and information literacy. She attended Samford University's Institute of Genealogy and Historical Research for the past three summers, finally earning her survival badge for the Advanced Methodology and Evidence Analysis course taught by Elizabeth Shown Mills. A recent transplant to the Washington, D.C. area, Madaleine looks forward to conducting research for herself and others at such local repositories as the Library of Congress and the National Archives. Her duties as copy editor of Casefile Clues include wrangling wayward prose, getting persnickety about punctuation, and coaxing more citations out of the long-suffering author/editor. Madaleine can be reached at kinfolit@gmail.com.

About Casefile Clues

Casefile Clues is a weekly genealogy newsletter focusing on sources, methodology, and case study analysis. Geared towards intermediate researchers, it concentrates on process, analysis and problem-solving using actual examples from research in a variety of locations, predominantly in the United States. It is written and compiled by Michael John Neill, a nationally known genealogist who has actively
researched for over twenty-five years and given day-long seminars in over thirty states across the United States. More information on Casefile Clues can be found at http://blog.casefileclues.com.