Monday, February 27, 2012

WikiTree Welcomes User Group Coordinator

WikiTree.com is proud to announce that Lianne Lavoie has become the WikiTree community's new User Group Coordinator. Lianne now facilitates the rapidly growing collaborative circles for historically-significant ancestors such as European aristocrats and Mayflower families.

Sharing modern family history is relatively simple: it can be done privately between family members who know each other. But as you go further back in time, collaboration becomes increasingly more complex and it is very important to carefully cite sources as well as communicate with other researchers. These challenges led WikiTree users to create discussion groups dedicated to widely-shared ancestors.

The members of these groups tackle the messiest problems of genealogical collaboration and push the envelope as to what is possible using WikiTree. Since their work is vital to the success of the World Family Tree project, Lianne is here to help ensure that they have what they need. When they need new tools, Lianne is here to help WikiTree develop them.

Lianne is a recent graduate of the University of Manitoba where she studied computer science and philosophy. She blogs about her genealogy research at Stories of a Canadian Family. Her many other interests range from book collecting to belly dancing.

About WikiTree: WikiTree's mission is to grow a single worldwide family tree which will ultimately make genealogy free and accessible for everyone. Privacy and collaboration are balanced so that families can share personal information, photos, and memories, while at the same time growing a valuable genealogical resource with distant cousins and strangers. WikiTree is entirely free for everyone but new members must be invited by a family member or fellow genealogist. See http://www.WikiTree.com/.

2012 Walter Lee Sheppard Jr. Prize Recipients

Debbie Hooper of Millsboro, Delaware and Jordan Jones of Raleigh, North Carolina, have been named the latest recipients of the Walter Lee Sheppard Jr. Prize, bestowed annually upon genealogists who demonstrate sound practices and exceptional potential. Candidates for the award are drawn from the Advanced Research Methodology and Evidence Analysis track at Samford University's Institute of Genealogy and Historical Research. The stipend awarded to each recipient covers the preliminary and final application fees for pursuing certification by the Board for Certification of Genealogists.

Past recipients of the prize include Judy Russell, CG, of Avenel, New Jersey; David Ouimette, AG, CG, of Highland Utah; Phil Burnett Adderly, CG, of Shreveport, Louisiana; and Teri Tillman, CG, of Natchez, Mississippi.

The Samford University IGHR and the Board for Certification of Genealogists (BCG) were both founded in 1964 by a cadre of genealogical educators seeking to advance quality and professionalism within the field. Across the decades, BCG has co-sponsored the IGHR; and a significant number of Board-certified genealogists have been its course coordinators and instructors.

The prize itself memorializes the late Walter Lee Sheppard Jr., one of the twentieth-century's leading genealogical scholars whose example strongly promoted sound reasoning and careful analysis in all genealogical specialties. As a mentor, his discerning eye could be counted upon to identify a missed source or clue in family reconstructions, thereby strengthening a colleague's conclusions. A founder and president of BCG, Lee was also a fellow and president of the American Society of Genealogists, the National Genealogical Society, the Genealogical Society of Pennsylvania, and other bodies. In 2007, he was elected to the National Genealogy Hall of Fame.

The Sheppard Prize is privately funded by an IGHR Track 4 graduate, for whom Lee acted as mentor and patron. The prize has no affiliation with the Board for Certification of Genealogists itself.

Sunday, February 26, 2012

NEHGS Co-sponsors The Revels Repertory Company Show: “An American Journey”

When: March 4, 2012 3:00PM - 4:30PM

Where: Arsenal Center for the Arts, 321 Arsenal St, Watertown, MA

Description: NEHGS is a proud sponsor of An American Journey, produced and performed by the Revels Repertory Company. This original musical theater production brings the story of American immigration to life in partnership with Watertown’s Arsenal Center for the Arts. The 90-minute production finds Italian, Irish, and Eastern European Jewish immigrants on a passenger ship bound for America circa 1907. Sharing their music and songs, their dances and their dreams, the diverse group of travelers become one, as they leave their hardships behind and steam toward America, the land of hope and promise.

Rhonda McClure, NEHGS Senior Researcher and an expert on American immigration, will give a pre-performance talk at 2:30 p.m. Learn more about starting your own family history journey.

Revels Repertory Co. is the touring ensemble of Revels, Inc., the national performing arts company that presents the Christmas Revels in ten cities across the U.S. The show is appropriate for adults and children ages six and up and includes audience participation.

Tickets: $20 adults ($18 for NEHGS members), $12 students/children 12 and under

For more information, please visit www.AmericanAncestors.org.

Friday, February 24, 2012

The Guild’s 6,000th member

The Guild of One-Name Studies has reached another milestone. Today the 6,000th member joined the Guild of One-Name Studies. She is Mrs Sue Fisher-Pascall who lives in Chichester, UK. This milestone follows a very successful year for the Guild of One-Name Studies in 2010-11 when the Guild achieved its highest number of new members ever.

Of the 387 new members joining in 2011, 220 were from the UK, 69 from the US, 33 from New Zealand, 26 from Australia, 17 from Canada and 15 from Ireland. The remainder were from various European countries. 43% of the new members were from non-UK regions, which is a valuable step towards increased worldwide membership to the Guild.

Sue is studying the surname Pascall, with the variants Pascal, Pashal and Paskal, and hopes that the Guild of One-Name Studies will enable her to help and link up with other people researching the same. Sue Fisher-Pascall said she was interested in the Guild of One-Name Studies because she had already done a lot of research on the Pascall surname generally, as part of her own family history, and joining seemed the logical way forward to share her research with other people researching the surname or one of its variants. Sue had previously considered joining the Guild but found that the surname “Pascall” had already been registered by another Guild member as a variant of their main study. When it was agreed that the surname could stand in its own right, she immediately joined the Guild and registered the surname as her one-name study. In recognition of becoming the 6,000 member of the Guild of One-Name Studies, the Guild has extended Sue’s membership a further year to the 31st October 2014.

Details of all the Guild facilities can be found at:

www.one-name.org/guildsvces.html

- where you can find out:

  • more about undertaking a one-name study
  • the benefits of joining the Guild of One-Name Studies, and the assistance members of the Guild can provide to anyone researching their family history on any of the 8,000 plus names currently being researched

Cliff Kemball, the Guild’s Publicity Officer, said today:

“Attaining our 6,000th member is a significant milestone for the Guild of One-Name Studies and is a testament to the continued development of the Guild internationally and the benefits membership provides. We are sure that Mrs Sue Fisher-Pascall will benefit significantly from joining the Guild and that she will gradually take advantage of the services and facilities that the Guild offers.”

National Genealogical Society Announces New Release in Voices of Genealogy Video Series: Robert Charles Anderson, FASG

ARLINGTON, VA, 24 FEBRUARY 2012: In celebration of the 100th anniversary of the National Genealogical Society Quarterly, NGS has created for its members a historical archive of interviews with some of the most important genealogists of the twentieth century. Beautifully filmed and produced by award winning filmmakers Kate Geis and Allen Moore, these video portraits capture for posterity the irreplaceable legacy of genealogists who have had a major influence on scholarship in genealogy.

The second release in the series features Robert Charles Anderson, FASG, and is now playing for all NGS members on the Society’s website (http://www.ngsgenealogy.org). Interviewed by Melinde Lutz Byrne, CG, FASG, co-editor of the National Genealogical Society Quarterly, Bob shares stories of his youth, his intriguing military service, his work in biochemistry, the discovery of genealogy, and how he developed his skills for historical research. Future episodes with Anderson are The Great Migration Study Project, Building Bridges between Genealogy and History, and The Goal and The Future of Genealogy. More information about the interviews is available in the January-February-March issue of the NGS Magazine.

The video interviews represent just one of the many opportunities NGS offers its members for becoming successful genealogists. Members receive the society’s outstanding publications, The National Genealogical Society Quarterly and the NGS Magazine, and can also take advantage of free courses and significant discounts on publications, courses, and the NGS annual conference to be staged in Cincinnati 9–12 May 2012 and in Las Vegas 8–11 May 2013.

Founded in 1903, the National Genealogical Society is dedicated to genealogy education, high research standards, and the preservation of genealogical records. The Arlington, Virginia-based nonprofit is the premier national society for everyone, from the beginner to the most advanced family historian, seeking excellence in publications, educational offerings, research guidance, and opportunities to interact with other genealogists.

Oh Canada! And England, Hungary, Italy, Russia, and US

22 February 2012

Mountain of free historic records online keeps growing weekly

FamilySearch added 2.8 million new, free records online this past week for Canada, England, Hungary, Italy, Russia, and the U.S. Got Hungarian roots? Check out the new 900,000 Hungary Reformed Church Christenings records. You might be surprised to know that FamilySearch now has over 2.5 billion free searchable records online now in its historic record collections. Find your ancestors now for free at FamilySearch.org.

Searchable historic records on FamilySearch.org are made possible by thousands of volunteers from around the world who transcribe (index) the information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the amount of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about how to personally help provide free access to the world’s historic genealogical records as a volunteer indexer at FamilySearch.org.

FamilySearch International is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer–driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter–day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch has been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources free online at FamilySearch.org or through over 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.


CollectionIndexed RecordsDigital ImagesComments
Canada, Lower Canada Census, 183191,9080Added indexed records to existing collection.
Canada, Lower Canada Census, 184246,4677,674New Index and browsable image collection.
Canada, New Brunswick, Late Registration of Births, 1810-1899024,015New browsable image collection.
England, Dorset, Parish Registers, 1538-1910332,6150New index collection.
Hungary Reformed Church Christenings, 1624-1895914,4410Added indexed records to existing collection.
Italy, Torino, Torino, Civil Registration (Tribunale), 1866-189948,1550New index collection.
Russia, Tver Confession Lists, 1728-19130953,146New browsable image collection.
U.S., North Carolina, Estate Files, 1663-19649,675250,339Added indexed records and browsable images to existing collection.
United States, Index to Indian Wars Pension Files, 1892-1926052,315New browsable image collection.
United States, Remarried Widows Index to Pension Applications, 1887-194206,749New browsable image collection.
United States, World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942 (HI)33,91471,648Added index records and browsable images to existing collection.

Archives.com Partners with W.E.B. DuBois Institute to Publish the Patriots of Color Database

REDWOOD CITY, Calif., Feb. 24, 2012 -- In honor of Black History Month, Archives.com, a website devoted to making family history simple and affordable, today announced the launch of the Patriots of Color Database. Archives.com is bringing this collection online for the first time, compiling years of research facilitated by the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research at Harvard University. These records unveil new and invaluable information about some of the men and women of color who fought for American independence in such roles as soldiers, skilled craftsmen, and servants. This new collection, of critical importance to historians, academics, and the general public, is now available for free at http://www.Archives.com/Patriots.

Henry Louis Gates Jr., the Director of the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute notes, "I was filming 'African American Lives' for PBS when historical researcher Jane Ailes shared a discovery that my fourth great-grandfather John Redman served in the Light Dragoons of the Continental Army from 1778-1784. I was astonished and delighted, and it drove me to want to learn more about other men and women of color who fought to win America's independence."

People of African descent were often not well documented in census records and traditional sources, making African family history research uniquely challenging. This Patriots of Color Database is a first large step in bringing to life the stories of early Americans of color and the contributions they've made to American history. Over two years of research has focused on verifying the service and complexion of patriots from each of the 13 colonies using primarily original records such as pension and bounty land application files, muster and pay rolls, lists of troops, court records, legislative records, census records, and more.

"Archives.com is proud to publish this valuable historical information and make it freely available to family historians and historical researchers," said Director of Product Joe Godfrey. "This is ultimately just the beginning of a much more extensive project, and we're excited to encourage more research and exploration of this relatively unknown and underappreciated group of patriots."

Funding for this project has been generously provided by David Roux, Richard Gilder and the Gilder Lehrman Foundation, Joseph Dooley and the Sons of the American Revolution, and the W. E. B. DuBois Institute for African and African American Research at Harvard University. Jane Ailes has acted as the primary researcher. The database is a summary of a portion of the information so far collected for each Patriot. This is the beginning of an extensive project, and these data are being made available at an early stage to encourage more research and scholarship, with further information to be published in the future. The Patriots of Color database is free for anyone to search and explore at http://www.Archives.com/Patriots.

About Archives

Archives.com is a leading family history website that makes discovering family history simple and affordable. The company has assembled more than 2 billion historical records in a single location, and makes them available at a price that's up to 80 percent less than the leading competitor. Archives also partners with other leading family history websites to provide integrated record collections, discounted memberships, official certificates and other special promotions. Archives.com is free to try for seven days, allowing anyone to explore the benefits of membership without risk or obligation. Archives.com is owned and operated by Inflection, a fast-growing data commerce company. Find more information at www.Inflection.com.

Ancestry.com Teams Up with Actor Blair Underwood to Support Big Brothers Big Sisters

Philadelphia, PA (February 24, 2012) -- Ancestry.com, the world’s largest online family history resource, has teamed up with one of its high-profile celebrity customers to support a national non-profit organization that helps youth overcome what are too often generational cycles of adversity.

Actor Blair Underwood will appear in a commercial promoting Ancestry.com’s support of Big Brothers Big Sisters, the nation’s largest mentoring network, proven to help children overcome adversity to achieve in school and succeed in life.

In the commercial, scheduled to air February 24, Underwood says discovering his family history on Ancestry.com gave him a greater understanding of himself. He goes onto say that while it’s incredible to know where you came from, it’s also important to know where you are going.

“That’s why I’m joining with Ancestry.com to support Big Brothers Big Sisters, an organization that helps kids reach their full potential,” states Underwood.

Big Brothers Big Sisters provides one-to-one mentoring services to children of single, low-income or incarcerated parents as well as sons and daughters of military personnel or those who face other forms of adversity. The new TV commercial airs February 24 on the heels of the announcement of the Big Brothers Big Sisters 2011 Youth Outcomes Survey Report, which shows statistically significant improvements for youth throughout the first year of enrollment. The improvements are in three areas – educational success, avoidance of risky behaviors and socio-emotional competency, measures that researchers link to long-term outcomes, such as high school graduation, avoidance of juvenile delinquency, and college or job readiness.

Ancestry.com has worked with Underwood on a network TV show that airs on Friday nights. The company provided important family history research for the show, including tracing the roots of the featured celebrities including Underwood. Each episode takes one celebrity on an emotional, and often times soul-searching journey to discover the lives of family members who came before them.

Ancestry.com is donating 20 percent of proceeds of all new subscriptions donated through www.ancestry.com/donate from February 24-29, 2012 to Big Brothers Big Sisters. Funding is used by Big Brothers Big Sisters to carefully screen volunteer mentors and match them with youth in long-term, staff monitored and supported friendships.

To view the commercial and to support Big Brothers Big Sisters, visit www.ancestry.com/donate.

About Big Brothers Big Sisters

Big Brothers Big Sisters, the nation’s largest donor and volunteer supported mentoring network, holds itself accountable for children in its program to achieve measurable outcomes, such as educational success; avoidance risky behaviors; and higher aspirations, greater confidence and better relationships. Partnering with parents/guardians, schools, corporations and others in the community, Big Brothers Big Sisters carefully pairs children (“Littles”) with screened volunteer mentors (“Bigs”) and monitors and supports these one-to-one mentoring matches throughout their course. The first-ever Big Brothers Big Sisters Youth Outcomes Summary, released in 2012, substantiates that its mentoring programs have proven, positive academic, socio-emotional and behavioral outcomes for youth, areas linked to high school graduation, avoidance of juvenile delinquency and college or job readiness.

Big Brothers Big Sisters provides children facing adversity, often those of single or low-income households or families where a parent is incarcerated or serving in the military, with strong and enduring, professionally supported one-to-one mentoring relationships that change their lives for the better, forever. This mission has been the cornerstone of the organization’s 100-year history. With about 360 agencies across the country, Big Brothers Big Sisters serves nearly 630,000 children, volunteers and families. Learn how you can positively impact a child’s life, donate or volunteer at BigBrothersBigSisters.org.

About Ancestry.com

Ancestry.com Inc. (Nasdaq:ACOM) is the world's largest online family history resource, with more than 1.7 million paying subscribers. More than 8 billion records have been added to the site in the past 15 years. Ancestry users have created more than 31 million family trees containing over 4 billion profiles. In addition to its flagship site www.ancestry.com, Ancestry.com offers several localized Web sites designed to empower people to discover, preserve and share their family history.

National Archives Announces Website for Free 1940 Census Release Online on April 2, 2012: 1940census.archives.gov

Press Release
February 21, 2012


Tomorrow Starts the Countdown of ’40 Days to the ’40 Census’

Washington, DC - Today the National Archives, with its partner Archives.com, launched its new website www.1940census.archives.gov in preparation for its first-ever online U.S. census release, which will take place on April 2, 2012, at 9 a.m. (EST). The public is encouraged to bookmark the website now in order to more quickly access the 1940 census data when it goes live. No other website will host the 1940 census data on its April 2 release date.

The National Archives has teamed up with the U.S. Census Bureau to celebrate “40 Days to the ’40 Census.” Using social media channels to post videos, images, facts, and links to workshops nationwide, the National Archives is getting its researchers ready for the online launch on April 2. Be sure to follow us on Twitter (using hashtag #1940Census), Facebook, Tumblr, Flickr, YouTube, and subscribe to our blogs: NARAtions and Prologue: Pieces of History.

On April 2, 2012, users will be able to search, browse, and download the 1940 census schedules, free of charge, from their own computers or from the public computers at National Archives locations nationwide through the new 1940 census website: www.1940census.archives.gov.

A National Archives 3:13 minute video short on its YouTube channel (http://tiny.cc/1940Census) and on www.1940census.archives.gov provides a “behind-the-scenes” view of staff preparations and gives viewers tips on how to access the data once it is launched on April 2. This video is in the public domain and not subject to any copyright restrictions. The National Archives encourages the free distribution of it.

Background on the 1940 Census

While the original intent of the census was to determine how many representatives each state was entitled to send to the U.S. Congress, it has become a vital tool for Federal agencies in determining allocation of Federal funds and resources. The census is also a key research tool for sociologists, demographers, historians, political scientists and genealogists. Many of the questions on the 1940 census are the standard ones: name, age, gender, and race, education, and place of birth. But the 1940 census also asks many new questions, some reflecting concerns of the Great Depression. The instructions ask the enumerator to enter a circled x after the name of the person furnishing the information about the family; whether the person worked for the CCC, WPA, or NYA the week of March 24–30, 1940; and income for the 12 months ending December 31, 1939. The 1940 census also has a supplemental schedule for two names on each page. The supplemental schedule asks the place of birth of the person's father and mother; the person's usual occupation, not just what they were doing the week of March 24–30, 1940; and for all women who are or have been married, has this woman been married more than once and age at first marriage.

For the release of the 1940 census online, the National Archives has digitized the entire census, creating more than 3.8 million digital images of census schedules, maps, and enumeration district descriptions.

About the National Archives

The National Archives and Records Administration is an independent Federal agency that preserves and shares with the public records that trace the story of our nation, government, and the American people. From the Declaration of Independence to accounts of ordinary Americans, the holdings of the National Archives directly touch the lives of millions of people. The National Archives is a public trust upon which our democracy depends, ensuring access to essential evidence that protects the rights of American citizens, documents the actions of the government, and reveals the evolving national experience.

About Archives.com

Archives.com is a family history website, owned and operated by Inflection a data commerce company headquartered in the heart of Silicon Valley. Inflection was chosen by the National Archives to host the 1940 census website. Learn more at www.archives.com/1940census.

Tuesday, February 21, 2012

ISGS Announces 2012 Webinar Series


Illinois State Genealogical Society is proud to announce its new webinar series for 2012. For those of you new to this form of genealogy education, webinars are lectures delivered over the internet that you can access on your computer from your home or office. On the second Tuesday of each month at 8 PM Central, we will hold a live webinar, which is free to anyone. ISGS members can access a recorded copy in the Members Section of the ISGS website at any time after the live event.

In January, we kicked off the series with Thomas MacEntee’s presentation, 10 Ways to Jumpstart You Genealogy in 2012. And on February 14, Lisa Alzo presented Cool Tools for Publishing Your Family History. Both of these presentations are now available to ISGS members in the Members Section of the ISGS website (http://ilgensoc.org/members.php).

On Tuesday, March 13, at 8 PM Central, Amy Johnson Crow CG will present, Desperately Seeking Susan: Finding Female Ancestors, where you will learn about sources and methodologies to help you find those elusive female ancestors. To attend this webinar, register at https://www3.gotomeeting.com/register/736521718.

The lineup for the 2012 webinar series is complete, and we have some exciting presentations planned with an array of fabulous speakers. Below is a partial list of upcoming webinars, but for the complete list, visit the Webinars page at the ISGS website at http://ilgensoc.org/cpage.php?pt=234.

We've also created a flyer that you are welcome to pass along to others who might be interested in attending ISGS webinars. Be sure to print a few and hand them out at your local society meetings. The flyer can be accessed at http://ilgensoc.org/upload/menu/2012webinarbrochure.pdf.

Upcoming Webinars

March 13 – Desperately Seeking Susan: Finding Female Ancestors with Amy Johnson Crow CG
Register at https://www3.gotomeeting.com/register/736521718

April 10 – Going Digital: Organizing Your Research Files Electronically with D. Joshua Taylor
Register at https://www3.gotomeeting.com/register/916785542

May 8 – Some Great, Seldom-Used, Resources: A Genealogical Potpourri with Timothy Pinnick
Register at https://www3.gotomeeting.com/register/542750318

Please direct any questions to the ISGS Education Committee at isgseducation@ilgensoc.org.

© 2012, copyright Illinois State Genealogical Society

Monday, February 20, 2012

Indiana Genealogical Society Annual Conference - April 28, 2012

February 20, 2012 – Fort Wayne, Indiana: The Indiana Genealogical Society (IGS) is holding its annual conference on April 28, 2012 at the Allen County Public Library (ACPL) in Fort Wayne, Indiana.

Debra S. Mieszala is the featured speaker. Her talks include:
  • Lessons from a Snoop: Collaterals and Associates
  • Bringing Our Soldiers Home
  • Digging Through Documents Word By Word
  • Patently Unique: Locating Patent Records, Online and Off

A second track of sessions features:
  • What’s New with FamilySearch with Michael Hall from FamilySearch
  • Finding Indiana Records and Research in FamilySearch with Michael Hall
  • Becoming an Expert on Using Ancestry with ACPL librarian, Melissa Shimkus
  • Writing a Book Using Family Tree Maker and Microsoft Word with Curtis Sylvester, President of the Allen County Genealogical Society of Indiana

Registration is $30 for IGS members, $40 for nonmembers and $45 at the door. Registration forms and online registration are available at http://www.indgensoc.org/conference.php.

Spend the day learning from experts, researching in the country’s second largest genealogical library and collaborating with other genealogists.

Come a day early to join the IGS pre-conference and gain research time in the library. Topics on April 27, 2012 include:
  • Indiana County Genealogists Show N’ Tell
  • Social Media for Our Societies
  • Ask the Experts Panel

Registration for the pre-conference is only $5 or $7 at the door. Find out more at www.indgensoc.org/seminar.php.

About the Indiana Genealogical Society

Formed in 1989, the Indiana Genealogical Society strives to help preserve and publish materials relating to the people who settled the state. IGS has been at the forefront of efforts to make Indiana’s historical records more accessible to the public by indexing and digitizing records. IGS has more than 500,000 records on its website, representing all 92 of Indiana’s counties. Learn more about IGS at http://www.indgensoc.org.

Sunday, February 19, 2012

FamilySearch Adds Free Records from 7 Countries

16 February 2012

FamilySearch Adds Free Records from 7 Countries
Millions of new records added to England, Italy, and U.S. Collections

This week FamilySearch added 12 million new, free records online (6.5 million indexed names and 5.6 million browsable images) for Canada, England, Germany, Italy, Korea, Netherlands, Spain, and the U.S. The Florida Death Index 1877-1998, received 5 million searchable records and another million records each for Oklahoma and Wisconsin. Find your ancestors now at FamilySearch.org.

Searchable records on FamilySearch.org are made possible by thousands of volunteers from around the world who transcribe (index) the information from handwritten records to make them easily searchable by computer. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the amount of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about how to personally help provide free access to the world’s historic genealogical records as an indexer at FamilySearch.org.

FamilySearch International is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer–driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter–day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch has been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources free online at FamilySearch.org or through over 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.


 
CollectionIndexed RecordsDigital ImagesComments
England, Kent, Land Tax Assessments, 1689-1832089,160New browsable image collection.
England, Kent, Wills and Probate, 1440-18810347,164New browsable image collection.
Germany, Saxony, Dresden, Citizen's Documents and Business Licenses, 1820-19620386,107New browsable image collection.
Italy, Messina, Messina, Civil Registration (Tribunale), 1866-19390696,799Added browsable images to existing collection.
Italy, Messina, Patti, Civil Registration (Tribunale), 1865-19100454,682New browsable image collection.
Korea, Collection of Genealogies, 1500-200906,534Added browsable images to existing collection.
Netherlands, Army Service Records, 1807-19290103,682New browsable image collection.
Nova Scotia, Church Records, 1720-2001016,188New browsable image collection.
Spain, Municipal Records084,921Added browsable images to existing collection.
U.S., California, Death Index, 1905-193905,692New browsable image collection.
U.S., California, Northern U.S. District Court Naturalization Index, 1852-198901,342,642Added browsable images to existing collection.
U.S., Colorado, Statewide Marriage Index, 1900-19390454,881New browsable image collection.
U.S., Florida, Death Index, 1877-19985,187,0740New Index collection. Index courtesy of Ancestry.com.
U.S., New Mexico, County Death Records, 1907-195205,479New browsable image collection.
U.S., Oklahoma, Applications for Allotment, Five Civilized Tribes, 1899-190701,373,449New browsable image collection.
U.S., South Dakota, School Records, 1884-19380193,492New browsable image collection.
U.S., Utah, Territorial Militia Records, 1849-1877011,306New browsable image collection.
U.S., Wisconsin, Death Index, 1820-1907435,2080New Index collection. Index courtesy of Ancestry.com.
U.S., Wisconsin, Marriage Index, 1973-1997948,9610New Index collection. Index courtesy of Ancestry.com.
United States, Mexican War Pension Index, 1887-1926051,991New browsable image collection.
United States, Old War Pension Index, 1815-1926028,984New browsable image collection.

Friday, February 17, 2012

FHL: Netherlands Research Series


The Family History Library Hosts Events in March 2012.

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH - Genealogists and family history enthusiasts looking for help with research in the Netherlands will be interested in classes held at the Family History Library in March. A free Netherlands Research Series will be held on Saturday, March 17, at the Family History Library. The classes will include:

9:00 a.m.    “Dutch Research on the Internet”
10:00 a.m.  “Using Dutch Civil Registration Records”
11:00 a.m.  “Dutch Church Records”

To view the class schedule online, go to www.familysearch.org.  Classes will be held in the B1 classroom on the first lower level of the Family History Library.  The library is located west of Temple Square on West Temple between North Temple and South Temple Streets in downtown Salt Lake City.  On Saturdays, parking is free to library patrons and is located behind the Church History Museum.

To register for these free classes, send an email to FHLClassReg@familysearch.org or call 1-801-240-4950. 

FHL: Ireland Research Series


The Family History Library Hosts Events in March 2012.

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH - Genealogists and family history enthusiasts looking for help with beginning research in Ireland will be interested in classes held at the Family History Library in March.  A free Hands-on Beginning Ireland Research Series will be held on Saturday, March 10, at the Family History Library.  The classes will include:

9:00 a.m.    “Immigration Sources”
10:00 a.m.  “Census and Civil Registration”
11:00 a.m.  “Church Records”
12:00 p.m.  “Practice Time”

To view the class schedule online, go to www.familysearch.org.  Classes will be held in the B2 classroom on the second lower level of the Family History Library.  The library is located west of Temple Square on West Temple between North Temple and South Temple Streets in downtown Salt Lake City.  On Saturdays, parking is free to library patrons and is located behind the Church History Museum. 

To register for these free classes, send an email to FHLClassReg@familysearch.org or call 1-801-240-4950. 

FHL: Pennsylvania Research Series


The Family History Library Hosts Events in March 2012.

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH - Genealogists and family history enthusiasts looking for help with research in Pennsylvania will be interested in classes held at the Family History Library in March. A free Pennsylvania Research Series will be held on Saturday, March 10, at the Family History Library. The classes will include:

9:00 a.m.    “Overview”
10:15 a.m.  “Land Records”
11:30 a.m.  “Vital and Church Records”
1:15 p.m.    “Court Records:  Probate, Civil and Criminal”

To view the class schedule online, go to www.familysearch.org.  Classes will be held in the Main floor classroom of the Family History Library.  The library is located west of Temple Square on West Temple between North Temple and South Temple Streets in downtown Salt Lake City.  On Saturdays, parking is free to library patrons and is located behind the Church History Museum.  

To register for these free classes, send an email to FHLClassReg@familysearch.org or call        1-801-240-4950. 

Thursday, February 16, 2012

MyHeritage brings DNA testing to the global community

World’s largest family network offers DNA testing to a new global audience - enabling millions of families to discover their ethnic roots and previously unknown relatives

PROVO, Utah & LONDON & TEL AVIV, Israel – February 16, 2012: MyHeritage, the most popular family network on the web, announced today the integration of DNA testing into its core family history offering. The move adds genetic genealogy to the company’s suite of tools for researching family history, used by millions of families around the world.
With more than 62 million registered users and 21 million family trees, MyHeritage has become the trusted home on the web for families wishing to explore their family history, share memories and stay connected. With the new biological layer added to the MyHeritage experience, users can now enjoy a service combining science, intuitive web features and social networking for discovering and sharing their family legacy.

“DNA testing provides a fascinating new way to discover one’s origins and find previously unknown relatives”, said MyHeritage Founder and CEO Gilad Japhet. “Offering the highest quality DNA tests to our tens of millions of users around the world in 38 languages, and providing DNA matches with hundreds of thousands of people who have already had their DNA tested, significantly advances our mission of bringing family history to the masses. By combining DNA with our innovative Smart Matching™ technology, families will be closer than ever before to constructing a more complete picture of their history”.

DNA is the hereditary material in humans and almost all other organisms. By purchasing a simple cheek-swab DNA test, users can now use information contained in their DNA to find present-day relatives who share a common ancestor up to many hundreds of years ago. A DNA test can also reveal ethnic origins such as Native American, African or Jewish descent on paternal or maternal lines, as well as uncover ancestral information for those who were adopted.  While DNA tests can break through brick walls in family history research by revealing biological relations, MyHeritage’s flagship Smart Matching™ technology then steps in to help piece together the paper trail by uncovering how the family trees of related people actually connect. In addition, people with the same paternal surname can get together via MyHeritage to see if they’re related by DNA.


MyHeritage is introducing today a wide range of DNA tests to meet different research objectives and budgets, with special discounted prices for MyHeritage subscribers starting from as low as $84. Users can identify the deep ancestral origins of their direct paternal line (Y-DNA), of their direct maternal line (mtDNA), find relatives across all lines via autosomal DNA (Family Finder), receive a percentage breakdown of their ethnic roots and confirm or disprove whether someone is a close relative. View the full list of the DNA kits on MyHeritage and a list of Frequently Asked Questions about DNA tests on MyHeritage.
For the analysis of users’ DNA tests and the DNA matching, MyHeritage is working with long-time partner and global leader in genealogy DNA, Family Tree DNA. Pioneers of genetic genealogy and with a state-of-the-art laboratory, Family Tree DNA has established the world’s largest DNA database for genealogy and is well known for its work with National Geographic on the Genographic Project. All information is kept strictly confidential and is never shared.
Bennett Greenspan, President and CEO of Family Tree DNA said “We’re proud to work with MyHeritage to bring DNA testing to a much wider, global audience. The phenomenal size and reach of the global MyHeritage family network will create new horizons in collecting DNA data, helping many more people discover their ancestral origins”.
About MyHeritage
MyHeritage is the most popular family network on the web. Millions of families around the world enjoy having a private and free place for their families to keep in touch and to showcase their roots. MyHeritage’s Smart Matching™ technology empowers users with an exciting and innovative way to find relatives and explore their family history. Following the November 2011 acquisition of FamilyLink in Provo, Utah, MyHeritage offers billions of historical records through its website WorldVitalRecords.com. With all family information stored in a secure site, MyHeritage is the ideal place to share family photos and preserve special family memories. The site is available in 38 languages. So far more than 62 million people have signed up to MyHeritage. The company is backed by Accel Partners and Index Ventures, the investors of Facebook and Skype. For more information visit www.myheritage.com