New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday, December 30, 2016


Over 972,000 new records are available to search this Findmypast Friday, including;


Over 900,000 records have been added to our collection of Irish Dog Licenses. These fantastic census substitutes cover all 26 counties in the Republic of Ireland, date back to 1866, and will allow you to find out the colour, breed and sex of your ancestor’s four legged friend.


Huntingdonshire Marriages 1754-1837 contains over 1,000 names taken from 26 volumes of marriage records from the Huntingdonshire district of Cambridgeshire. These records will allow you to discover when, where and to whom your ancestor was married.


Was your Scottish ancestor admitted to the local dispensary in the market town of Kelso? Explore registers containing over 1,700 names that list the date and outcome of patients’ treatment (such as cured, relieved of symptoms, or died).


Over 67,000 new articles and five new titles have been added to the Periodical Source Index. The new titles cover the American Historical Society, Chicago, Maryland, and British family histories & heraldry and will allow you to discover articles, photos, and other material you might not find using traditional search methods.

Midwest African American Genealogy Institute Celebrates Milestone Year!

Midwest African American Genealogy Institute Celebrates Milestone Year!


Chicago, IL-December 23, 2016 - The Midwest African American Genealogy Institute a nationally acclaimed genealogy institute is opening registration for the 5th consecutive year to individuals interested in African American Genealogy. “The Genealogy Center in Indiana, is very pleased to partner with this great institute", said Curt Witcher, The Genealogy Center Manager at the Allen County Public Library in Fort Wayne, Indiana. MAAGI 2017 will be held from Tuesday, July 11 to Thursday, July 13 at this world famous genealogy repository. The goal is to provide education, through research with the right resources. MAGGI fulfills an educational need in the study of African American genealogy by enhancing skills and introducing resources in African American Genealogy and Family History Research. The 2017 attendees will select a track in which they immersed themselves in a core curriculum for three days taking 12 different classes, guided by nationally recognized genealogy instructors.

  • Track 1: Fundamental Genealogy Research Methods and Strategies
    “Research, analyze, formulate the question and learn”
  • Track 2: DNA & Genealogy
    “Review, analyze, evaluate & connect DNA with the dots with your genealogy”
  • Track 3: Intermediate Genealogy: Pre & Post Slavery Era Research
    “New resources, document review and analysis”
  • Track 4: Genealogy Writing From Planning to Publication
    “Learn how to turn your genealogy into telling the story”

MAAGI is the only African American focused event offering a total of 48 classes with multiple tracks over 3 days with evening lectures, and guided personalized instruction. Since 2013, the Midwest African American Genealogy Institute (MAAGI) has provided an amazing learning experience for genealogists and researchers. The Institute, also known commonly as MAAGI has grown and has taken its place as a trusted educational and training institute.

MAAGI's history is a unique one, having been hosted for the first three years at Harris Stowe State University, in St. Louis. Participants found that MAAGI provided genealogical training and guidance needed to expand their skills. For 2016, the MAAGI experience was hosted at one of the largest genealogy libraries in the country, Allen County Public Library (ACPL) in Ft. Wayne Indiana. The faculty was delighted to take the institute to Allen County, and this next year, participants will be able to take advantage of being at this amazing repository once again, and will be able to utilize the research opportunities while there.

New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday, December 23, 2016


Over 56,000 new records are available to search this Findmypast Friday, including;


Gloucester Apprentices 1595-1700 contains the details of over 20,000 apprentices, masters and their relatives who were listed in the Calendar of the Registers of Apprentices of the City of Gloucester 1595-1700. Originally published by The Bristol and Gloucestershire Archaeological Society, the calendar has been digitised through optical character recognition (OCR), which allows you to search images of text for your ancestor’s name or a keyword, such as your ancestor’s trade.

Each record will list the apprentices chosen trade, residence, the name of their father, the name of their master, the name of their master’s wife, the length of their term and the amount they were paid at the end of their training.


Over 36,000 new additions have been made to our collection of Kent parish records, including;

  • Over 14,000 additional baptisms
  • Over 1,000 additional banns records
  • Over 11,000 additional marriages
  • Over 9,000 additional burials

The new records date all the way back to 1538 and cover the parishes of Wrotham, Stansted, Wouldham, Southfleet, and Leybourne.


Scotland Mental Health Institutions Admissions contains over 1,000 records from over 50 mental health institutions including asylums and poorhouses.

Each record includes a transcript of an original document held by National Records of Scotland that will allow you to discover your ancestors’, birth place, birth date, former residence the institution they were sent to and the date of their admission.


Search over 17,000 transcripts of prison registers to find out if your ancestors spent time in jail between 1828 and 1884.

Each record will list your ancestors’ age, birth year, birth place, occupation, former residence, offence and place of imprisonment.

Millions more records and enhanced interface added to TheGenealogist’s Diamond subscription


Using TheGenealogist's highly praised unique SmartSearch and its wealth of records you’ll have a better chance of finding your ancestors and adding them to your family tree.

You can benefit from all the great new records released as part of our Diamond Subscription with our specially priced Christmas Offer.

This month sees the release of:-

New High Resolution zoomable 1891 census images,
Over 4 million Emigration records,
More than 2.1 million Parish Records,
Over 1 million individuals in new Army & Navy Lists (1778-1915)
Thousands of new headstones added (Total 53,000 indexed headstone photos in 459 cemeteries.)

TheGenealogist can help you to build your family tree and locate more of your ancestors with its wealth of genealogical records that include Births, Marriages & Deaths, Census, Parish Records, Non-Conformist Records, Wills, Military Records, Education Records, Poll & Electoral Records. In addition to this you'll also be able to use TreeView, an online family tree builder with full privacy control.

2016 Diamond Releases

Over the last year we have already added the following:

  • Over 12 million Parish records
  • Thousands of Newspapers
  • New Occupational Records
  • Early Army Records
  • Prisoner of War records
  • Colour Tithe Maps for multiple counties, with more coming in 2017
  • 220 Million US Census Records
  • Millions of US Death Records
  • Post Office Directories
  • New War Memorials
  • New Headstone Records

What’s Coming to TheGenealogist in 2017!

And in the New Year you’ll see even more New Data Sets coming to TheGenealogist

  • Millions of new and unique Parish Records
  • Bishops’ Transcripts are being added for many more counties.
  • A new and unique record set covering detailed records of our ancestors houses, which will be searchable by name, address and area, with high resolution maps showing the property.
  • Our ongoing project with The National Archives is set to release yet more detailed Colour County and Tithe Maps with tags to show where your ancestors lived.
  • 1921 census substitute, using a wide variety of records including Trade and Residential Directories of the time.
  • New decades of BT27 Passenger Lists and Emigration Records
  • Expanded International Headstone Project to cover Commonwealth cemeteries.
  • More worldwide War Memorials added to our comprehensive database.
  • Following on from our release of over 230 million U.S. records in 2016, we will be launching more U.S. records.
  • Updated high resolution image sets.

Look out for these exciting new developments and more in 2017 at TheGenealogist.co.uk

New Historic Records on FamilySearch: Week of December 19, 2016



SALT LAKE CITY, UT—Treat your family to the gift of new family history discoveries this holiday season. New historic church records were published online this week from Bolivia, Ecuador, and England, along with cemetery, census, civil registration, and probate records from Africa, South America, and France. Explore the complete interactive list of new records at FamilySearch.

About FamilySearch and Its Historic Records Access Initiative

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world's historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org/indexing.

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,921 family history centers in 129 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.




New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday, December 16, 2016



Over 285,000 new records are available to search this Findmypast Friday including;


Containing over 10,000 records, British Army discharges, 60th Foot 1854-1880, will allow you to find out if your ancestor served in the King’s Royal Rifle Corps. This collection of discharge records will allow you to uncover their service number, rank, and the reason for their discharge.
The 60th Regiment of Foot saw action in the Seven Years War, Napoleonic Wars, and Peninsular War. They have served in India, Burma, Afghanistan, China, and South Africa. The men found in these records most likely fought in The Indian Mutiny (1857-1859), in Canada during the Fenian raids (1866-1867), and The Zulu War (1879).


Middlesex War Memorials contains over 21,000 transcripts of memorials from over 40 parishes across the English county of Middlesex. The collection lists the names of soldiers who died while on active service between 1845 and 1998 and covers 13 conflicts.
Each record will provide you with a transcript of the individual entry from the war memorial, as well as a full transcript of all the names that appeared alongside your ancestor. Each transcript will reveal the conflict they served in, where and when they were killed, a brief description and any additional notes. Transcripts also include links from the West Middlesex Family History Society providing greater detail about the memorial such as the memorial’s location and explanations of abbreviations.


The Queensland Passports Index 1915-1925 is an index of passport registers containing over 13,000 names. The original registers were compiled by the Collector of Customs, Brisbane, and are currently held by the National Archives of Australia. Each record includes a transcript that will reveal the year the record was taken, your ancestor’s address, the date they applied for or renewed a passport and where their intended destination.

Depending on the period covered, the registers themselves may include additional information such as passport numbers, warrant numbers, remarks and additional dates associated with the issuing of passports, and occupations. Remarks may include details about soldiers returning home from the Great War.


Explore the only surviving records from the 1841 census of New South Wales. Containing just under 11,000 names, this collection includes both fully searchable transcripts and scanned images of the original household returns, affidavit forms, and abstracts of returns that will allow you to discover where your ancestors were living in 1841.

Images of the original forms may occasionally provide you with additional information or insight such as your ancestor’s religion, occupation, or civil condition. The amount of information included will vary depending on the type of document.


Over 13,000 records have been added to our collection of British Histories and Reference Guides. The collection consists of 65 volumes on genealogy, heraldry, palaeography, geography, and more. The details gleaned from these titles will provide you with the contextual information you need to create full profiles of your ancestors and the lives they led. They will add quality to your family history and your overall understanding of British genealogy.

The subject matter varies greatly in this large collection of publications. A full list of all titles included can be found at the bottom of the search page.

BCG Announces 2017 Webinar Schedule

The Board for Certification for Genealogists is proud to announce its webinar line-up for 2017. All webinars will be broadcast by Legacy Webinars, and held on the third Tuesday of the month at 8pm Eastern. The webinar schedule is as follows:


  • 17 January – Michael Leclerc, CG, “Writing up your Research”
  • 21 February – Karen Stanbary, CG, “Weaving DNA Test Results into a Proof Argument”
  • 21 March – Rebecca Koford, CG, “Are You My Grandpa? Men of the Same Name”
  • 18 April – Rick Sayre, CG, “The Genealogy in Government Documents”
  • 16 May – Debbie Parker Wayne, CG, “MAXY DNA: Correlating mt-at-X-Y DNA with the GPS”
  • 20 June – Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, “Beating the Bushes: Using the GPS to Find Jacob Bush’s Father”
  • 18 July - Angela Packer McGhie, CG, “Analyzing Documents Sparks Ideas for Further Research"
  • 15 August – LaBrenda Garrett-Nelson, CG, “Analyzing Probate Records of Slaveholders to Identify Enslaved Ancestors“
  • 19 September – Tom Jones, PhD, CG, “When Does Newfound Evidence Overturn a Proved Conclusion?“
  • 17 October, David Ouimette, CG, “Databases, Search Engines, and the Genealogical Proof Standard”
  • 21 November – Malissa Ruffner, JD, CG, “Research in Federal Records: Some Assembly Required”
  • 19 December – Judy Russell, JD, CG, CGL, “The Law and the Reasonably Exhaustive (Re)Search”

President Jeanne Larzalere Bloom, CG, says, “The Board for Certification of Genealogists is excited to offer this webinar series that supports our mission to provide education for family historians. These webinars will address genealogy standards for research. By promoting a uniform standard of competence and ethics, the BCG endeavors to foster public confidence in genealogy.”

To register for any of these webinars, please visit our page at Legacy Family Tree Webinars: http://familytreewebinars.com/BCG.

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. For more information contact: office@BCGcertification.org.

View BCG’s past Legacy webinars at http://familytreewebinars.com/BCG and http://BCGcertification.org/blog/bcg-webinars. For more information on BCG’s education opportunities, please visit: http://familytreewebinars.com/BCG.

New Historic Records on FamilySearch: Week of December 12, 2016


SALT LAKE CITY, UT—FamilySearch added new historic records this week for Brazil, England, Ireland, Namibia, Peru, and the United States. Significant records were added to the Ireland (Valuation Office Books 1831-1856) and Freedmen's Bureau (1865-1872) collections. Search these new records for free at FamilySearch.org.

About FamilySearch and Its Historic Records Access Initiative

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world's historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org/indexing.

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,921 family history centers in 129 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.




New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday, December 9, 2016


Over 205 million new records and newspaper articles are available to search this Findmypast Friday including;


Over 204 million new articles and 8 new titles have been added to our collection of historic British newspapers. The new additions include the Northern Daily Telegraph, Illustrated Sporting and Dramatic News, Britannia and Eve, The Sketch, The Sphere, Evening Star, Shipley Times and Express and the Southern Echo.


The Worcestershire Probate Index 1660-1858 contains over 51,000 records taken from four varieties of probate documents that will allow you to uncover details surrounding your Worcestershire ancestor’s last will and testament. Each record includes a transcript that will reveal when they died, their occupation and how their estate was handled.


Buckinghamshire Marriages contains over 49,000 records that will allow you to discover when, where and to whom your ancestor was married. The collection consists of transcripts covering 26 parishes within the English county of Buckinghamshire.


Was your ancestor an officiating minister in New Zealand in 1882? Find out with an index containing over 600 records and covering 13 religious denominations. Each record includes a transcript that will reveal their official title and the church they served.


Find out if you have military is memorialised in Auckland’s Waikaraka Cemetery with a memorial commemorating over 100 veterans who fought for the Empire and who died at the Auckland Veterans’ Home between 1902 and 1940. Each record includes a transcript that will list their birth year, death year, age at death and force or regiment.


Did your ancestor take the Civil Service examination in New Zealand? Explore this collection of more than 700 records and uncover the details of those who sat for the annual examinations for admission to, or promotion in, the Civil Service in mid-December 1906 and mid-January 1907.

New Historic Records on FamilySearch: Week of December 5, 2016



SALT LAKE CITY, UT—FamilySearch added new historic records this week for Brazil, England, Ireland, Namibia, Peru, and the United States. Significant records were added to the Ireland (Valuation Office Books 1831-1856) and Freedmen's Bureau (1865-1872) collections. Search these new records for free at FamilySearch.org.

About FamilySearch and Its Historic Records Access Initiative

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world's historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org/indexing.

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,921 family history centers in 129 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.




A Genealogist's Guide to Boston, Massachusetts Released

A Genealogist's Guide to Boston, Massachusetts Released


The fourth in a series of guides to popular research destinations

The In-Depth Genealogist is pleased to present their newest book in the research series by writer, Jacqueline Gamble entitled “A Genealogist’s Guide to Boston, Massachusetts”. The book is a great resource for genealogists who plan on researching in this geographic area. Approximately 12 million people from all over the world visit Boston every year to take in its beautiful harbor, amazing history, museums, sporting events, and more. With its mixture of old buildings (some dating back to the 1600s), new skyscrapers, and everything in between, Boston truly is a meeting of past, present and future.

This guide will provide you with what you will need to know when planning a genealogy trip to Boston. Within the book is information on repositories, libraries, historical societies, cemeteries, attractions, accommodations, and more in and around Boston.

"A Genealogist’s Guide to Boston, Massachusetts” is available now as a PDF, Kindle, and Nook download ($4.99) through The In-Depth Genealogist Store (http://theindepthgenealogist.com/shop-idg/idg-products/). The paperback book will soon be available for just $9.99 in a convenient pocket sized, 5” x 8”, so it will easily fit in your bag or jacket. Subscribers to the website receive a 10% discount on purchase of the book.

Jacky Gamble is a genealogist, historian and freelance writer. She discovered her passion for genealogy while crafting a list of cousins in her very large family. She sought the help of the internet for locating missing cousins and instead discovered records of her grandparents, great grandparents, 2nd great grandparents and so much more. The more ancestors she discovered, the more she wanted to know. And thus began her love of this hobby. She has yet to finish her original list of cousins.

When Jacky is not researching genealogy, she is writing about it. She regularly posts to her personal blogs at Tracing My New England Roots (http://genealogyvt.blogspot.com/) and The Graveyard Rabbit of Vermont (http://vermontgyrabbit.blogspot.com/). Her articles have been published in various Internet publications and in Family Chronicle magazine. Jacky is the author of The In-Depth Genealogist’s column “Remembering Olde New England” in Going In-Depth magazine.

New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday, December 2, 2016


Over 8.9 million new records are available to search this Findmypast Friday including;


New South Wales Passenger Lists contains over 8.5 million records. This collection includes records of both assisted and unassisted passengers. The assisted passenger lists cover 1828 to 1896 and the unassisted passenger lists span the years 1826 to 1900. Assisted passengers refers to those who received monetary assistance from another party or agency/government for their passage.

Each result will provide a transcript and image of the original record. The information included on the transcript will vary depending on whether your ancestor was an assisted or unassisted passenger, although most will include your ancestors name, passage type, birth year, nationality, departure port, arrival port and the dates of their travels.


Scotland Non-Old Parish Registers Vital Records 1647-1875 is a collection of registers created by churches outside of the established church. It contains over 12,000 transcripts of births, marriages, and deaths and is a useful alternative to the Church of Scotland's old parish records.

Non-old parish registers are distinctively different from the Church of Scotland's old parish records. The original records are held by the National Records of Scotland and have been diligently transcribed by Graham and Emma Maxwell. The majority span from 1684 until 1861 and cover seven Scottish counties.


Royal Irish Constabulary Service Records 1816-1922 contains over 486,000 records released in association with the National Archives. The collection will allow you to uncover intimate details of your ancestor's career with the R.I.C and includes a plethora of records related to the running and administration of the organisation including general registers, disbandment registers, nominal returns, and more. You can also find records of Royal Irish Constabulary clerical staff.

Each result includes an image of the original document and a transcript. The nature of the information recorded will vary significantly depending on the subject and type of the original document. A full list of the various record types included in the collection can be found at the bottom of the search page.


Over 43,000 records have been added to our Royal Irish Constabulary History & Directories collection. The collection allows you to explore a variety of publications printed between 1840 and 1921 that will provide further insight into the administration and daily operations of the police force as well as the history of the organisation.

Each record includes a PDF image of the original publication. The collection includes training manuals, codes of conduct, salary scales, circulars and staff lists that cover promotions, deployments, rules & regulations and much more.

New Royal Irish Constabulary Service Records available at to search at Findmypast



  • Over 486,000 RIC service records released online
  • Thousands of new records added to existing collection of RIC histories & directories


Today, December 2nd 2016, over 530,000 Royal Irish Constabulary records have been published online at Findmypast. The release consists of one brand new collection, Royal Irish Constabulary Service Records 1816-1922, and new additions to their existing collection of Royal Irish Constabulary History & Directories.

Digitised from original records held by The National Archives, the new Royal Irish Constabulary Service Records 1816-1922 collection contains a wide variety of documents from the series HO 184.Each record includes both an image of the original document and a transcript of the information it recorded.

The collection will allow researchers from all over the world to uncover intimate details of their ancestor’s career with the RIC and consists of over 486,000 records pertaining to the running and administration of the force. This includes;

  • Auxiliary division general registers: nominal rolls that recorded member’s service number, rank, dispersed date, and company name. The registers also include division journals that recorded dates of appointment, promotions, and medical details.
  • Clerical staff: record of service and salaries: lists of clerical staff that include birth date, age at appointment, rank, department and salary.
  • Constabulary Force Funds: correspondence registers of members who paid into the fund with notes on whether they had been pensioned, died or received any rewards from the fund.
  • Constabulary lists: Lists of chief constables created during the first year of the Royal Irish Constabulary.
  • Disbandment registers: Lists of serving members who were with the force in 1922 when it disbanded after the creation of the Free Irish State. They also noted the number of years the constable served and their recommended pension.
  • General registers: Records of constables’ service history. The entries include the individual’s birth date, native county, religion, previous occupation, date of appointment, and promotions, as well as any rewards or punishments received and the date of pension or discharge.
  • Nominal returns, arranged by counties: lists of all serving members of the Royal Irish Constabulary organised by county that recorded the individual’s number, rank, name, religion, date of appointment, marital status, and station location.
  • Officers’ registers: lists of Officers that include transfers and dates, favourable and unfavourable records, dates of promotions and details of previous military service.
  • Pensions and gratuities: pension records that reveal the constable’s rate of pay and the amount of pension calculated.
  • Recruits index: Lists of new recruits, their dates of appointment and arrival, and their company.

Royal Irish Constabulary Service Records 1816-1922 also contains a variety of additional documents that record details of the Force’s daily operations. These include correspondences, intelligence notes, programmes of ceremony, constabulary codes and lists of “good men” to name but a few. Over 43,000 additional records have also been added to Findmypast’s existing Royal Irish Constabulary History & Directories collection, an archive of publications printed between 1840 and 1921 that provide further insight into the inner workings and history of the organisation.

The publication marks the latest step in Findmypast’s commitment to making Irish family history more accessible. In less than 5 years, Findmypast have made over 110 million records (with 300 million names) available online for the first time.

About The Royal Irish Constabulary

The Royal Irish Constabulary was established as a peace-keeping force dedicated to the detection and prevention of crime throughout Ireland. They also took over the responsibility of the Revenue Police to enforce the laws of whiskey production. The force trained at Phoenix Park Depot.

During the Irish War of Independence, RIC barracks were the targets of frequent attacks from the Irish Republican Army. Due to a decrease in members for reasons of death, injury, low recruitment, and resignation, the British government dispatched auxiliary forces of ex-servicemen to make up the numbers. This auxiliary force became known as the Black and Tans because of their uniform and were notorious for their brutality. The Anglo-Irish treaty ended the war on 6 December 1921 and the Irish Free State was established in January 1922. The Royal Irish Constabulary was disbanded in August 1922 and a new police force, Garda Síochána, took its place. In Northern Ireland, the police force became the Royal Ulster Constabulary.

About Findmypast

Findmypast (previously DC Thomson Family History) is a British-owned world leader in online family history. It has an unrivalled record of online innovation in the field and 18 million registered users across its family of online brands, which includes Lives of the World War 1, The British Newspaper Archive and Genes Reunited, amongst others.

Its lead brand, also called Findmypast, is a searchable online archive of over eight billion family history records, ranging from parish records and censuses to migration records, military collections, historical newspapers and lots more. For members around the world, the site is a crucial resource for building family trees and conducting detailed historical research.

In April 2003, Findmypast was the first online genealogy site to provide access to the complete birth, marriage, and death indexes for England & Wales, winning the Queen’s Award for Innovation. Since that time, the company has digitized records from across the globe, including major collections from Britain, Ireland, Australia, and the United States. Findmypast, in association with The National Archives, recently launched the 1939 Register, a record of 41 million lives on the eve of World War II.

Registration Opens for the National Genealogical Society's 2017 Family History Conference


Registration Opens for the National Genealogical Society's 2017 Family History Conference


ARLINGTON, VA, 1 DECEMBER 2016— Registration is now open for the National Genealogical Society’s thirty-ninth annual Family History Conference, Family History Lives Here, which will be held 10–13 May 2017 at the Raleigh [NC] Convention Center. To register on or after 1 December 2016, visit the NGS website at http://conference.ngsgenealogy.org/register/ and complete the online registration form.

Throughout its history, North Carolina has been home to a diverse population including Native Americans and those who trace their heritage back to Europe and Africa. During colonial times, it was one of a few colonies that embraced religious diversity, welcoming Quakers, Huguenots, Methodists, and Moravians. It is a land rich in cultural traditions. From the lighthouses on the outer banks to the falling waters on the Piedmont, to the dramatic overlooks in the mountains, this land calls us back to take a closer look. The Tar Heel story is vibrant, shared through the words of each family, and recorded in the wonderful records, manuscripts, and artifacts preserved in the numerous North Carolina archives, special collections, museums, libraries, historical sites, and societies.

With a focus on records, repositories and methodology, the conference program offers family historians numerous topics to help them advance their research. Other genealogical subjects featured at the NGS Family History Conference will include US Reconstruction, maps and locations, historical context, and research tips and techniques. Some highlights of the sessions are Deborah Abbott’s “Stories from the Back Door of the Swannanoa-Berkeley Hotel: My Family History,” Rick Fogarty’s “The Moravians and the Cherokees: From Piedmont to Tahlequah,” and Angela Packer McGhie’s “Using Identity Characteristics to Locate Your Ancestors.” A four-day DNA track features lectures on interesting developments and uses of DNA tests, and thorough analysis of the results. A workshop on chromosome mapping and a workshop on creating DNA citations and proof arguments are also planned. Single-day tracks focus on church records, military topics, and Native American research. Technology and its increasing role in research is addressed in a variety of presentations including a two-day track on tools and methods to use technology to enhance your family history research. A Skillbuilding track will again be sponsored by the Board for the Certification of Genealogists (BCG) for intermediate to advanced researchers interested in improving their research skills.

A number of special events have been planned with limited seating, so be sure to register on 1 December, or as soon as possible thereafter, if you plan to attend these events. To register online, visit the NGS website at http://conference.ngsgenealogy.org/register/. The online searchable program is available at http://conference.ngsgenealogy.org/program/ and the PDF brochure is available at https://goo.gl/uci0ec. The brochure includes an overview of the sessions, tours, pre-conference events, registration times, and rates as well as general conference and hotel details. Attendees are urged to visit the conference blog, http://conference.ngsgenealogy.org/blog/, which will feature tips on local and regional research facilities, things to do in and around North Carolina, and updated information on hotel availability and local restaurants.

Founded in 1903, the National Genealogical Society is dedicated to genealogical education, exemplary standards of research, and the preservation of genealogical records. The Arlington, Virginia-based nonprofit is the premier national society for everyone, from the beginner to the most advanced family historian seeking excellence in publications, educational offerings, and guidance in research. It also offers many opportunities to interact with other genealogists.

BCG Offers Free Webinar by Judy G. Russell 20 December 2016 8pm Eastern

BCG OFFERS FREE WEBINAR Tuesday, 20 December, 8:00 p.m. Eastern

“No, no, Nanette! What negative evidence is . . . and isn't” by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL

Negative evidence is the hardest type of evidence to understand or use in genealogical research. By definition, a “type of evidence arising from an absence of a situation or information in extant records where that information might be expected,” it is, as the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes told us in the short story “Silver Blaze,” the “curious incident . . . in the night-time”—the thing we would expect to see or hear but that just isn't there. Learn more about what negative evidence is—and what it isn't—and how to use it.

The Board for Certification of Genealogists (BCG) will present “No, no, Nanette! What negative evidence is . . . and isn't” by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL, free to the public at 8:00 p.m. EDT, 20 December 2016.

A genealogist with a law degree, Judy G. Russell is a lecturer, educator and writer who enjoys helping others understand a wide variety of genealogical issues, including the interplay between genealogy and the law. She has a bachelor's degree in political science and journalism from George Washington University in Washington, D.C. and a law degree from Rutgers School of Law-Newark, and holds Certified Genealogist and Certified Genealogical Lecturer credentials from the Board for Certification of Genealogists where she serves as a member of the Board of Trustees. She has worked as a newspaper reporter, trade association writer, legal investigator, defense attorney, federal prosecutor, law editor and, until recently, Judy was an adjunct member of the faculty at Rutgers Law School. Judy is a Colorado native with roots deep in the American south on her mother's side and entirely in Germany on her father's side. Visit her website at www.legalgenealogist.com.

President Jeanne Larzalere Bloom, CG, says “The Board for Certification of Genealogists is proud to offer this new webinar as part of an ongoing series that supports our mission to provide education for family historians. This webinar will address genealogy standards for research. By promoting a uniform standard of competence and ethics BCG endeavors to foster public confidence in genealogy.”

Register for “No, no, Nanette! What negative evidence is . . . and isn't” by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL, before 20 December 2016 at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/529243703022691843

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. For more information contact: office@BCGcertification.org.

View BCG’s past Legacy webinars at http://familytreewebinars.com/bcg and http://bcgcertification.org/blog/bcg-webinars. For more information on BCG’s education opportunities, please visit: http://www.BCGcertification.org/certification/educ.html.

The words Certified Genealogist are a registered certification mark, and the designations CG, CGL and Certified Genealogical Lecturer are service marks of the Board for Certification of Genealogists®, used under license by board certificants after periodic evaluation.

FamilySearch celebrates 10 years of indexing historic records


Unprecedented crowd-sourced initiative has made billions of records easily searchable online for free

Salt Lake City, Utah (28 November 2016), You go online to FamilySearch. You type an ancestor’s name. You instantly find your ancestor in any number of 5.5 billion historical records in the free online database. You are elated at how easy it was as you fill in another missing piece of your family tree puzzle. That successful experience was brought to you by a phenomenon called indexing. And most likely, you were the recipient of a free gift empowered by the efforts of many online indexing volunteers.

Next week (December 5th) is International Volunteer Day, and FamilySearch International is celebrating the 10th anniversary of its web-based, volunteer-driven, indexing initiative, which started in 2006. The migration from the previous CD-ROM-based format to the web has been nothing short of amazing, and the rest has been record-making history—literally. The indexing initiative is the largest undertaking of its kind and is unparalleled in its achievements.

FamilySearch celebrates 10 years of indexing historic records

As a thank you to indexers and the millions of people who have found family documents from their efforts, FamilySearch is sharing a collection of free downloadable “I HEART Families” images for use on social media, or as cell phone and computer wallpaper.

FamilySearch and its predecessors have been gathering and preserving the world’s historic records to assist people like me and you in making family history discoveries. It publishes millions of digital images of historic records from around the world on FamilySearch.org weekly. FamilySearch’s proprietary software, a lot of computing power, and the contributions of hundreds of thousands of volunteers and countless millions of donated hours make the genealogically rich names and information hidden on those historic records easily and freely searchable to millions of curiosity seekers online.

In 2006, the call went out for volunteers to help in this unprecedented, global cause, and the online community responded. In fact, in just 10 years, over 1.2 million volunteers worldwide have joined the cause and continue to donate much needed time and talent to help index the world’s historic genealogical records.

In the past 10 years, online volunteers have personally pored over 1.5 billion images of historic records from all over the world and made over 5 billion ancestral names conveniently searchable to me and you from any web-enabled device.

Who are these unsung heroes? “They are your next door neighbors and work colleagues who continue to respond to the call to make the world’s historic records freely searchable online for anyone interested in discovering the branches of their family trees,” said Collin Smith, a marketing manager for FamilySearch Indexing. “They hail from all over the world—200 countries to be exact and collectively, the volunteers speak and read 58 languages.”

Why do they do it? Their motivations vary according to Smith. Some are paying it forward because they personally have benefited from priceless searchable record collections online. Others like participating in something meaningful and historic that will make a big difference somehow. Ornella Lepore, a native of Naples, Italy, now living in the United States, helps index Italy’s records online—particularly those pertaining to her ancestral roots. “I can’t afford to travel to Italy as often or whenever I want to do my family history research,” said Lepore. “Having the historic records indexed online where my ancestors are from will help me in my research in the long run.” Not every historic collection from Italy she helps with will hold keys to her personal research, but she knows in time, some of them will. And that’s motivation enough for her.

The entire suite of US Censuses from 1790 to 1940 is most notable of the volunteers’ efforts. All of those records are now freely searchable online at FamilySearch.org. In 2010, the power of this online community was unleashed on the newly released 1940 US Census. They indexed the entire census—all 3.8 million pages of it—in just 4 months, giving access to 134 million names.

And so these volunteers continue to show up daily online, unsung and untold in the internet clouds, ages 12–95, picking historic projects of interest and making a difference for the next person online hoping to find an ancestor in the growing sea of historic records.

Learn more about volunteering online at FamilySearch Indexing. Find this release and additional supporting photos in the FamilySearch Media Room.

About FamilySearch

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,921 family history centers in 129 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

National Genealogical Society 2017 Family History Conference Program Now Available



ARLINGTON, VA, 28 NOVEMBER 2016—The National Genealogical Society is pleased to announce the release of its 2017 Family History Conference program, Family History Lives Here. The program, which includes more than 175 lectures, is now available online at http://conference.ngsgenealogy.org/program/ and as a sixteen-page registration brochure, which can be downloaded at https://goo.gl/uci0ec.

Experts in genealogical research and history will address a broad array of topics, including records pertaining to the Carolinas and neighboring states, migration into and out of the region, military records, and state/federal records. Additional themes will discuss researching Native American, African American, and female ancestors as well as families with black sheep. Presentations about sharing methodology; solving research problems, and a full track on DNA research in genealogy will round out the conference.

The conference will take place at the Raleigh Convention Center located in Raleigh, North Carolina, 10–13 May 2017. Registration opens on 1 December 2016 at http://conference.ngsgenealogy.org/register/. A number of special events have been planned with limited seating, so register on 1 December, or as soon as possible thereafter, if you plan to attend these events.

Up-to-date information about the availability, amenities, and rates for conference hotels can be found at http://conference.ngsgenealogy.org/attend/accommodations/.

Sign up for the NGS Conference Blog at http://conference.ngsgenealogy.org/blog/ so you do not miss conference news or announcements.

Founded in 1903, the National Genealogical Society is dedicated to genealogical education, exemplary standards of research, and the preservation of genealogical records. The Arlington, Virginia- based nonprofit is the premier national society for everyone, from the beginner to the most advanced family historian seeking excellence in publications, educational offerings, and guidance in research. It also offers many opportunities to interact with other genealogists.

APG Election Results


Nine Board Members and Two Nominating Committee Members Join to Support World's Largest Professional Organization for Genealogy

WHEAT RIDGE, Colo., 25 November 2016 - The Association of Professional Genealogists (APG®) has unveiled the results of its election of new board members and nominating committee members. APG membership elected nine at-large representative board members for two-year terms, 2017-2018. Two nominating committee members were chosen for the 2017 term. The newly-elected board members include:

  • Blaine Bettinger, PhD, JD, of New York
  • Kathleen Brandt of Missouri
  • Ruy Cardoso, CG, of Massachusetts (incumbent)
  • Rose Lerer Cohen, PhD, of Israel
  • Luana Darby of Utah (incumbent)
  • Valerie Eichler Lair of Minnesota
  • Nicole Gilkison LaRue, CG, of Maryland
  • Leslie Brinkley Lawson of Washington
  • Corey Oiesen of California

Nominations Committee

Elected to one-year terms on the nominations committee are:

  • Craig Roberts Scott, MA, CG, FUGA, of North Carolina
  • Tristan Tolman, AG, of Utah

"Welcome new and returning board members," said APG President, Billie Stone Fogarty. "Our members have done a great job at electing genealogists with a variety of experience that will aid in moving the organization forward. I look forward to working with them. I also thank our retiring board members for their service."

About the Association of Professional Genealogists

The Association of Professional Genealogists (www.apgen.org), established in 1979, represents more than 2,700 genealogists, librarians, writers, editors, historians, instructors, booksellers, publishers and others involved in genealogy-related businesses. APG encourages genealogical excellence, ethical practice, mentoring and education. The organization also supports the preservation and accessibility of records useful to the fields of genealogy and history. Its members represent all fifty states, Canada and thirty other countries. APG is active on LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook.

New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday, November 25, 2016


Over 285,000 new records and newspaper articles are available to search this Findmypast Friday including:


Over 4,000 records including 140 years’ worth of personnel files and enlistment registers pertaining to the Scots Guards have been added to our collection of British Army Service records. The Scots Guards, part of the Guards Division, is one of the Foot Guards regiments of the British Army. Their origins lie in the personal bodyguard of King Charles I of England and Scotland and the regiment has a long and proud history of service to the sovereign in times of war and peace.


Queensland, Mackay, Funeral notices and funeral director records consists of over 44,000 transcripts of records kept by the local firms Melrose & Fenwick and Mackay Funerals as well as funeral notices published in the Daily Mercury. The indexes of funeral parlour records will reveal your ancestor’s age at death and funeral date. The Daily Mercury Funeral notices run from 1955 to 2012 and will reveal your ancestors age, birth year, date of death, burial date, and place.


Pennsylvania baptisms contains over 4,500 transcripts of original baptism records kept by Christ Church, Philadelphia. Each record will list your ancestor’s birth year, baptism date, baptism location, the names of both parents and mother’s maiden name. Parent’s names can be included in the search to narrow down your results.


Pennsylvania burials contains over 1,000 transcripts of original death records from Susquehanna County. Each transcript will reveal when your ancestor died and where they were laid to rest. They may also reveal important biographical details such the year your ancestors was born, their occupation, residence, the names of their parents and the name of their spouse.


Over 17,000 new records covering the state of Pennsylvania have been added to our collection of United State Marriage records. The entire collection now contains over 140 million records. Each record includes a transcript and an image of the original document that lists the marriage date, the names of the bride and groom, birthplace, birth date, age, residence as well as fathers' and mothers' names. When available, images will often include additional details about your ancestor's marriage.


Over 177,000 new articles and two brand new titles, the Tyrone Courier and the Mayo Constitution, are now available to search in our collection of historic Irish Newspapers.

New Historic Records on FamilySearch: Week of November 21, 2016



SALT LAKE CITY, UT—Maybe one of your ancestors is in FamilySearch.org's newly published 1916 Denmark census records, civil registrations from Hungary, Sweden church records, Ohio death, South Carolina birth, or Wyoming obituary records. See and share the detailed list of this week's new additions online at media.familysearch.org.


About FamilySearch and Its Historic Records Access Initiative

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world's historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org/indexing.

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,921 family history centers in 129 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.




Findmypast Friday - Millions of new 1939 records available to search



Over 2 million new records are available to search this Findmypast Friday including:


The 1939 register now contains over 5 million more records than it did at launch. In the year since the Register was launched, Findmypast has matched millions of 'closed records' to multiple data sources to correctly confirm the date and location of death for individuals recorded. This process has resulted in more than three million records being opened in the past 12 months, while an additional two million records have been opened in the past week to mark the first anniversary of the register's launch.

The 1939 Register now contains more than 32.8 million open records. Each record includes the names of inhabitants at each address, their date of birth, marital status and occupation. A wealth of contextual information, including period photographs never before seen online, infographics, region-specific newspaper articles and historical and contemporary maps, are personally tailored to each record, offering a rich and unique user experience unrivalled by any other family history research tool to date.


Containing over 280,000 records, this index lists the details of New South Wales railway and tramway employees who died while serving in the First World War.

The index was compiled from a single volume, printed in 1924, by the State Records NSW volunteer program and contains 1,214 entries. It covers a wide variety of military units and will reveal the year your ancestor was killed, the unit there were serving with and the railway or tram branch they worked for.


Britain, The National Guard In The Great War 1914-1918 is 316 page tribute to the role of the 'Home Guard' during the First World War. Trained to assist in the event of an invasion of Britain during the war, the National Guard was made up of men considered too old for active service. This history of the first 'dad's army' gives great insight into the important service rendered by these volunteers during the war.

Originally published in 1920, the volume includes a number of photographs and lists of the men who served, including those who went on to join the regular forces as the war progressed.


Ireland, 19th Century Directories allows you to search across more than 120 volumes of fascinating Irish directories containing more than 74,000 records. A listing may reveal your ancestor's occupation, place of business and/or home address. The directories were published annually, which means that you may be able track your ancestor year by year. Most of the details in the directories were collected six months before publication; therefore, all the listings are six months old. The type of information recorded will vary depending on the publication and year although most will list the names of local gentry and professionals as well as merchants, traders, and, in some publications, local officials.

The records are presented as PDFs (portable digital files). This feature allows you to narrow your search by publication, year and page number. After selecting an image, you can read through the whole directory by using the previous and next buttons at the top of the image.

The Scott Brothers (HGTV’s Property Brothers) Will Keynote RootsTech 2017

The Scott Brothers (HGTV’s Property Brothers) Will Keynote RootsTech 2017

Jonathan Scott and Drew Scott, who star in HGTV's “The Property Brothers,” will give RootsTech 2017 attendees unique insights into the role their family has had in their lives. The 6' 5" identical twin brothers will be the Thursday keynote speakers at RootsTech on February 9, 2017, in Salt Lake City, Utah. The popular brothers share passions for film and entertainment and for renovating older homes into dream homes. They have combined those passions to form an entertainment empire which became Scott Brothers Entertainment—an independent production company.

The Scott brothers garner HGTV’s highest ratings and are syndicated to major networks worldwide. Their first series, the Property Brothers, spun off several other series including Brother vs BrotherBuying and SellingProperty Brothers at Home, and Property Brothers at home on the Ranch. They recently authored their first book, Dream Home.

Their journey in entertainment includes much more than home improvement shows. Jonathan began performing in live theater and in TV and film as a child. He became a successful illusionist winning many awards and even performed live in Las Vegas. Drew was a high school basketball star and began acting in theater, improve, and sketch comedy in his teens. He even performed as a clown until he tired of the costumes and face paint.

The pair developed a passion for real estate as teens, purchasing their first fixer-upper house when they were 17. They did some renovations, and sold it a year later for a $50,000 profit to help support them as actors for a time before they decided to go back to college.

The Scott brothers were born in Vancouver, Canada. Their parents didn’t know they were going to have twins until the doctor saw Drew shortly after Jonathan was born. Because they lived on a ranch, Drew and Jonathan embraced the value of work at a young age—starting their first business at age seven. Their parents supported their various endeavors and encouraged them to pursue their dreams. “Our dad told us, ‘Don’t ever let anyone tell you that you can’t do something. Think of five ways you can do it, and then do it,’” Drew said, and that advice has become their mantra.

Both Drew and Jonathan are licensed real estate agents, but for their show, Drew is shown as the real estate agent and Jonathan as the contractor. Together they built their dream home in Las Vegas which has been featured on their series. The Scotts are involved in various philanthropic initiatives in North America and around the world.

At RootsTech, the brothers will talk about their unique family ties, and the can-do attitudes it fostered, their positive outlooks, and childhoods, their careers, their shared passions for buying and renovating property, and for the entertainment industry.

Find and share this release online at media.familysearch.org.

About RootsTech

RootsTech, hosted by FamilySearch, is a global conference celebrating families across generations, where people of all ages are inspired to discover and share their memories and connections. This annual event has become the largest of its kind in the world, attracting tens of thousands of participants worldwide.

Findmypast celebrates first anniversary of 1939 Register launch with millions of new records





Five million additional records now available to explore

The 1939 Register was launched online on November 2nd 2015 by Findmypast in association with The National Archives. Dubbed ‘The Wartime Domesday Book’, it is a comprehensive survey of the civil population of England and Wales at the onset of the Second World War. One year on, more than five million ‘closed records’ have been opened up and are now available to search.

November 16th 2016, one year on since the eagerly awaited 1939 Register was launched online by Findmypast, more than five million additional records have been made available, providing more people than ever before with the opportunity to discover details of their family, their home and their community.

In September 1939, just days after war had been declared, 65,000 enumerators were employed to visit every house in England and Wales to take stock of the civil population. The information that they recorded was used to issue Identity Cards, plan mass evacuations, establish rationing and co-ordinate other war-time provisions. In the longer term, the 1939 Register would go on to play a central role in the establishment of post-war services like the NHS.

The Register was updated in some cases until 1991, meaning that many people born less than 100 years ago but who had died prior to 1991 had their record opened automatically. Owing to data protection regulations, the personal details of people known to be born less than 100 years ago and still alive, had to be kept hidden. Records such as these were marked as ‘officially closed’ and, of the 41 million original records that make up the register, approximately 13 million (around 32%) were ‘closed’ at publication.

In the year since the Register was launched, Findmypast has matched millions of ‘closed records’ to multiple data sources to correctly confirm the date and location of death for individuals recorded. This process has resulted in more than three million records being opened in the past 12 months, while an additional two million records have been opened in the past week to mark the anniversary of the register’s launch.

The 1939 Register now contains more than 32.8 million open records that can now be accessed as part of a 12-month British or World subscription. Each record includes the names of inhabitants at each address, their date of birth, marital status and occupation. A wealth of contextual information, including period photographs never before seen online, infographics, region-specific newspaper articles and historical and contemporary maps, are personally tailored to each record, offering a rich and unique user experience unrivalled by any other family history research tool to date.

The 1939 Register is of particular significance for family historians as it bridges an important 30-year gap. The 1931 census was destroyed in the war and the 1941 census was never taken. The 1921 census will not be released until 2022.

Paul Nixon, military expert at Findmypast says: “It is fitting that the 1939 Register, so long a ‘living document’ that was continually updated by the NHS, is still very much alive now that is has been published by Findmypast. The opening up and release of a further five million records in the last 12 months means that more than ever before we can reach out to our recent past and discover where our ancestors were living, and what they were doing at the start of the Second World War.

Audrey Collins, family history records specialist at The National Archives says: “The 1939 Register has been a tremendous resource for family and local historians since it was released, and has become even better since then. As well as five million new records, and the addition of the 'Browse' function, there are unexpected finds: details of previous military service and unusual 'occupations' such as 'on holiday from Australia'. And the first two people in the whole register were called Mr and Mrs Start!

About Findmypast

Findmypast (previously DC Thomson Family History) is a British-owned world leader in online family history. It has an unrivalled record of online innovation in the field and 18 million registered users across its family of online brands, which includes Lives of the First World War, The British Newspaper Archive and Genes Reunited, amongst others.

Its lead brand, also called Findmypast, is a searchable online archive of over four billion family history records, ranging from parish records and censuses to migration records, military collections, historical newspapers and lots more. For members around the world, the site is a crucial resource for building family trees and conducting detailed historical research.

In April 2003, Findmypast was the first online genealogy site to provide access to the complete birth, marriage, and death indexes for England & Wales, winning the Queen’s Award for Innovation. Since that time, the company has digitised records from across the globe, including the 1911 Census which they digitised in association with The National Archives.

About The National Archives

The National Archives is one of the world’s most valuable resources for research. As the official archive and publisher for the UK government, and England and Wales they are the guardians of some of the UK's most iconic national documents, dating back over 1,000 years. Their role is to collect and secure the future of the government record, both digital and physical, to preserve it for generations to come, and to make it as accessible and available as possible. The National Archives brings together the skills and specialisms needed to conserve some of the oldest historic documents as well as leading digital archive practices to manage and preserve government information past, present and future.
http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/ http://www.legislation.gov.uk/

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New Historic Records Published at FamilySearch.org: Week of November 14, 2016



SALT LAKE CITY, UT—Check out the 11.8 million free, new records from the historic New York Passenger List indexes published this week! In addition, millions more immigration and other historic records were published from American Samoa, Brazil, Chile, Peru, South Africa, Venezuela, and the United States. Many thanks go to the diligent volunteer indexers around the world for completing these projects.

About FamilySearch and Its Historic Records Access Initiative

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world's historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org/indexing.

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,921 family history centers in 129 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.