Friday, January 8, 2016

New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday, January 8, 2016

This week’s Findmypast Friday marks the release of over 106,000 new UK records. This week’s new additions include nearly three centuries of Electoral Registers from Plymouth and West Devon that not only allow you to discover where your ancestors lived, but also who they voted for. Substantial updates have also been made to our collections of Kent baptisms, banns, marriages and burials from the parishes of Addington, Ash, Cuxton, Ridley and Offham.

The Plymouth & West Devon Electoral Registers, 1780-1983, is a collection of parish and parliamentary electoral rolls, electoral registers and lists of county voters that have been digitised and indexed by in partnership with the Plymouth & West Devon Record Office. This collection stretches across three centuries and includes years not found in our collection of England & Wales Electoral Registers 1832-1932. Another exciting aspect of this collection is that, in many cases, the records will actually reveal who your ancestor voted for. This can provide you a rare insight into how your ancestor viewed the world and give you a better understanding of their place in society.

Each record consists of a transcript and an image of the original document. Each transcript will include your ancestor’s name, the year the records was taken, where it was taken and the event it was recording. Images can include additional place information such as electoral district, parish and/or address while additional annotations on the registers my state if the person was deceased. Records from before the Secret Ballot Act of 1872 record which candidate the individual voted for.

Over 16,000 new records have been added to our collection of Kent baptismal records. The new additions cover the parishes of Addington, Ash, Cuxton, Ridley and Offham and state the date and place an individual was baptised into a church. Each record comprises a transcript of the original baptism register. The amount of information listed varies and records may include your ancestor’s parent’s names, their father’s occupation, mother’s maiden name and any additional notes.

New records from five Kent parishes are now available to search in our collection of Kent banns. Each record includes a transcript of the original banns book that includes the couple’s names, where and when their banns were read, each party’s home parish and their previous marital status.

Over 4,000 records have been added to our collection of Kent marriage records. Each record comprises a transcript of the original marriage register that includes the full names, respective ages and residences of both the bride and groom. Some later records may also include the groom’s occupation, the bride’s marital status, the occupations of their parents and any additional notes.

11,000 new records have been added to our collection of Kent burial records. Each record comprises a transcript of the original parish register entry for the burial. The amount of information listed varies, but most records will include your ancestor’s name, age, residence and the exact date of their burial as well as where and when it took place. A number of records may also reveal their job title as well as additional notes that can reveal fascinating details about their lives.

Don’t forget to regularly check our dedicated Findmypast Friday page to keep up to date with all the latest additions.

About Findmypast

Findmypast (previously DC Thomson Family History) is a British-owned world leader in online genealogy. It has an unrivalled record of online innovation in the field of family history and 18 million registered users across its family of online brands, which includes Mocavo, Genes Reunited, The British Newspaper Archive amongst others.

Its lead brand, also called Findmypast, is a searchable online archive of over two billion family history records, from parish records and censuses to migration records, military collections, historical newspapers and lots more. For members around the world, the site is a crucial resource for building family trees and doing detailed historical research.