Wednesday, November 30, 2016

BCG Offers Free Webinar by Judy G. Russell 20 December 2016 8pm Eastern

BCG OFFERS FREE WEBINAR Tuesday, 20 December, 8:00 p.m. Eastern

“No, no, Nanette! What negative evidence is . . . and isn't” by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL

Negative evidence is the hardest type of evidence to understand or use in genealogical research. By definition, a “type of evidence arising from an absence of a situation or information in extant records where that information might be expected,” it is, as the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes told us in the short story “Silver Blaze,” the “curious incident . . . in the night-time”—the thing we would expect to see or hear but that just isn't there. Learn more about what negative evidence is—and what it isn't—and how to use it.

The Board for Certification of Genealogists (BCG) will present “No, no, Nanette! What negative evidence is . . . and isn't” by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL, free to the public at 8:00 p.m. EDT, 20 December 2016.

A genealogist with a law degree, Judy G. Russell is a lecturer, educator and writer who enjoys helping others understand a wide variety of genealogical issues, including the interplay between genealogy and the law. She has a bachelor's degree in political science and journalism from George Washington University in Washington, D.C. and a law degree from Rutgers School of Law-Newark, and holds Certified Genealogist and Certified Genealogical Lecturer credentials from the Board for Certification of Genealogists where she serves as a member of the Board of Trustees. She has worked as a newspaper reporter, trade association writer, legal investigator, defense attorney, federal prosecutor, law editor and, until recently, Judy was an adjunct member of the faculty at Rutgers Law School. Judy is a Colorado native with roots deep in the American south on her mother's side and entirely in Germany on her father's side. Visit her website at www.legalgenealogist.com.

President Jeanne Larzalere Bloom, CG, says “The Board for Certification of Genealogists is proud to offer this new webinar as part of an ongoing series that supports our mission to provide education for family historians. This webinar will address genealogy standards for research. By promoting a uniform standard of competence and ethics BCG endeavors to foster public confidence in genealogy.”

Register for “No, no, Nanette! What negative evidence is . . . and isn't” by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL, before 20 December 2016 at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/529243703022691843

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. For more information contact: office@BCGcertification.org.

View BCG’s past Legacy webinars at http://familytreewebinars.com/bcg and http://bcgcertification.org/blog/bcg-webinars. For more information on BCG’s education opportunities, please visit: http://www.BCGcertification.org/certification/educ.html.

The words Certified Genealogist are a registered certification mark, and the designations CG, CGL and Certified Genealogical Lecturer are service marks of the Board for Certification of Genealogists®, used under license by board certificants after periodic evaluation.

Monday, November 28, 2016

FamilySearch celebrates 10 years of indexing historic records


Unprecedented crowd-sourced initiative has made billions of records easily searchable online for free

Salt Lake City, Utah (28 November 2016), You go online to FamilySearch. You type an ancestor’s name. You instantly find your ancestor in any number of 5.5 billion historical records in the free online database. You are elated at how easy it was as you fill in another missing piece of your family tree puzzle. That successful experience was brought to you by a phenomenon called indexing. And most likely, you were the recipient of a free gift empowered by the efforts of many online indexing volunteers.

Next week (December 5th) is International Volunteer Day, and FamilySearch International is celebrating the 10th anniversary of its web-based, volunteer-driven, indexing initiative, which started in 2006. The migration from the previous CD-ROM-based format to the web has been nothing short of amazing, and the rest has been record-making history—literally. The indexing initiative is the largest undertaking of its kind and is unparalleled in its achievements.

FamilySearch celebrates 10 years of indexing historic records

As a thank you to indexers and the millions of people who have found family documents from their efforts, FamilySearch is sharing a collection of free downloadable “I HEART Families” images for use on social media, or as cell phone and computer wallpaper.

FamilySearch and its predecessors have been gathering and preserving the world’s historic records to assist people like me and you in making family history discoveries. It publishes millions of digital images of historic records from around the world on FamilySearch.org weekly. FamilySearch’s proprietary software, a lot of computing power, and the contributions of hundreds of thousands of volunteers and countless millions of donated hours make the genealogically rich names and information hidden on those historic records easily and freely searchable to millions of curiosity seekers online.

In 2006, the call went out for volunteers to help in this unprecedented, global cause, and the online community responded. In fact, in just 10 years, over 1.2 million volunteers worldwide have joined the cause and continue to donate much needed time and talent to help index the world’s historic genealogical records.

In the past 10 years, online volunteers have personally pored over 1.5 billion images of historic records from all over the world and made over 5 billion ancestral names conveniently searchable to me and you from any web-enabled device.

Who are these unsung heroes? “They are your next door neighbors and work colleagues who continue to respond to the call to make the world’s historic records freely searchable online for anyone interested in discovering the branches of their family trees,” said Collin Smith, a marketing manager for FamilySearch Indexing. “They hail from all over the world—200 countries to be exact and collectively, the volunteers speak and read 58 languages.”

Why do they do it? Their motivations vary according to Smith. Some are paying it forward because they personally have benefited from priceless searchable record collections online. Others like participating in something meaningful and historic that will make a big difference somehow. Ornella Lepore, a native of Naples, Italy, now living in the United States, helps index Italy’s records online—particularly those pertaining to her ancestral roots. “I can’t afford to travel to Italy as often or whenever I want to do my family history research,” said Lepore. “Having the historic records indexed online where my ancestors are from will help me in my research in the long run.” Not every historic collection from Italy she helps with will hold keys to her personal research, but she knows in time, some of them will. And that’s motivation enough for her.

The entire suite of US Censuses from 1790 to 1940 is most notable of the volunteers’ efforts. All of those records are now freely searchable online at FamilySearch.org. In 2010, the power of this online community was unleashed on the newly released 1940 US Census. They indexed the entire census—all 3.8 million pages of it—in just 4 months, giving access to 134 million names.

And so these volunteers continue to show up daily online, unsung and untold in the internet clouds, ages 12–95, picking historic projects of interest and making a difference for the next person online hoping to find an ancestor in the growing sea of historic records.

Learn more about volunteering online at FamilySearch Indexing. Find this release and additional supporting photos in the FamilySearch Media Room.

About FamilySearch

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,921 family history centers in 129 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

National Genealogical Society 2017 Family History Conference Program Now Available



ARLINGTON, VA, 28 NOVEMBER 2016—The National Genealogical Society is pleased to announce the release of its 2017 Family History Conference program, Family History Lives Here. The program, which includes more than 175 lectures, is now available online at http://conference.ngsgenealogy.org/program/ and as a sixteen-page registration brochure, which can be downloaded at https://goo.gl/uci0ec.

Experts in genealogical research and history will address a broad array of topics, including records pertaining to the Carolinas and neighboring states, migration into and out of the region, military records, and state/federal records. Additional themes will discuss researching Native American, African American, and female ancestors as well as families with black sheep. Presentations about sharing methodology; solving research problems, and a full track on DNA research in genealogy will round out the conference.

The conference will take place at the Raleigh Convention Center located in Raleigh, North Carolina, 10–13 May 2017. Registration opens on 1 December 2016 at http://conference.ngsgenealogy.org/register/. A number of special events have been planned with limited seating, so register on 1 December, or as soon as possible thereafter, if you plan to attend these events.

Up-to-date information about the availability, amenities, and rates for conference hotels can be found at http://conference.ngsgenealogy.org/attend/accommodations/.

Sign up for the NGS Conference Blog at http://conference.ngsgenealogy.org/blog/ so you do not miss conference news or announcements.

Founded in 1903, the National Genealogical Society is dedicated to genealogical education, exemplary standards of research, and the preservation of genealogical records. The Arlington, Virginia- based nonprofit is the premier national society for everyone, from the beginner to the most advanced family historian seeking excellence in publications, educational offerings, and guidance in research. It also offers many opportunities to interact with other genealogists.

Friday, November 25, 2016

APG Election Results


Nine Board Members and Two Nominating Committee Members Join to Support World's Largest Professional Organization for Genealogy

WHEAT RIDGE, Colo., 25 November 2016 - The Association of Professional Genealogists (APG®) has unveiled the results of its election of new board members and nominating committee members. APG membership elected nine at-large representative board members for two-year terms, 2017-2018. Two nominating committee members were chosen for the 2017 term. The newly-elected board members include:

  • Blaine Bettinger, PhD, JD, of New York
  • Kathleen Brandt of Missouri
  • Ruy Cardoso, CG, of Massachusetts (incumbent)
  • Rose Lerer Cohen, PhD, of Israel
  • Luana Darby of Utah (incumbent)
  • Valerie Eichler Lair of Minnesota
  • Nicole Gilkison LaRue, CG, of Maryland
  • Leslie Brinkley Lawson of Washington
  • Corey Oiesen of California

Nominations Committee

Elected to one-year terms on the nominations committee are:

  • Craig Roberts Scott, MA, CG, FUGA, of North Carolina
  • Tristan Tolman, AG, of Utah

"Welcome new and returning board members," said APG President, Billie Stone Fogarty. "Our members have done a great job at electing genealogists with a variety of experience that will aid in moving the organization forward. I look forward to working with them. I also thank our retiring board members for their service."

About the Association of Professional Genealogists

The Association of Professional Genealogists (www.apgen.org), established in 1979, represents more than 2,700 genealogists, librarians, writers, editors, historians, instructors, booksellers, publishers and others involved in genealogy-related businesses. APG encourages genealogical excellence, ethical practice, mentoring and education. The organization also supports the preservation and accessibility of records useful to the fields of genealogy and history. Its members represent all fifty states, Canada and thirty other countries. APG is active on LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook.

New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday, November 25, 2016


Over 285,000 new records and newspaper articles are available to search this Findmypast Friday including:


Over 4,000 records including 140 years’ worth of personnel files and enlistment registers pertaining to the Scots Guards have been added to our collection of British Army Service records. The Scots Guards, part of the Guards Division, is one of the Foot Guards regiments of the British Army. Their origins lie in the personal bodyguard of King Charles I of England and Scotland and the regiment has a long and proud history of service to the sovereign in times of war and peace.


Queensland, Mackay, Funeral notices and funeral director records consists of over 44,000 transcripts of records kept by the local firms Melrose & Fenwick and Mackay Funerals as well as funeral notices published in the Daily Mercury. The indexes of funeral parlour records will reveal your ancestor’s age at death and funeral date. The Daily Mercury Funeral notices run from 1955 to 2012 and will reveal your ancestors age, birth year, date of death, burial date, and place.


Pennsylvania baptisms contains over 4,500 transcripts of original baptism records kept by Christ Church, Philadelphia. Each record will list your ancestor’s birth year, baptism date, baptism location, the names of both parents and mother’s maiden name. Parent’s names can be included in the search to narrow down your results.


Pennsylvania burials contains over 1,000 transcripts of original death records from Susquehanna County. Each transcript will reveal when your ancestor died and where they were laid to rest. They may also reveal important biographical details such the year your ancestors was born, their occupation, residence, the names of their parents and the name of their spouse.


Over 17,000 new records covering the state of Pennsylvania have been added to our collection of United State Marriage records. The entire collection now contains over 140 million records. Each record includes a transcript and an image of the original document that lists the marriage date, the names of the bride and groom, birthplace, birth date, age, residence as well as fathers' and mothers' names. When available, images will often include additional details about your ancestor's marriage.


Over 177,000 new articles and two brand new titles, the Tyrone Courier and the Mayo Constitution, are now available to search in our collection of historic Irish Newspapers.

Tuesday, November 22, 2016

New Historic Records on FamilySearch: Week of November 21, 2016



SALT LAKE CITY, UT—Maybe one of your ancestors is in FamilySearch.org's newly published 1916 Denmark census records, civil registrations from Hungary, Sweden church records, Ohio death, South Carolina birth, or Wyoming obituary records. See and share the detailed list of this week's new additions online at media.familysearch.org.


About FamilySearch and Its Historic Records Access Initiative

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world's historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org/indexing.

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,921 family history centers in 129 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.




Saturday, November 19, 2016

Findmypast Friday - Millions of new 1939 records available to search



Over 2 million new records are available to search this Findmypast Friday including:


The 1939 register now contains over 5 million more records than it did at launch. In the year since the Register was launched, Findmypast has matched millions of 'closed records' to multiple data sources to correctly confirm the date and location of death for individuals recorded. This process has resulted in more than three million records being opened in the past 12 months, while an additional two million records have been opened in the past week to mark the first anniversary of the register's launch.

The 1939 Register now contains more than 32.8 million open records. Each record includes the names of inhabitants at each address, their date of birth, marital status and occupation. A wealth of contextual information, including period photographs never before seen online, infographics, region-specific newspaper articles and historical and contemporary maps, are personally tailored to each record, offering a rich and unique user experience unrivalled by any other family history research tool to date.


Containing over 280,000 records, this index lists the details of New South Wales railway and tramway employees who died while serving in the First World War.

The index was compiled from a single volume, printed in 1924, by the State Records NSW volunteer program and contains 1,214 entries. It covers a wide variety of military units and will reveal the year your ancestor was killed, the unit there were serving with and the railway or tram branch they worked for.


Britain, The National Guard In The Great War 1914-1918 is 316 page tribute to the role of the 'Home Guard' during the First World War. Trained to assist in the event of an invasion of Britain during the war, the National Guard was made up of men considered too old for active service. This history of the first 'dad's army' gives great insight into the important service rendered by these volunteers during the war.

Originally published in 1920, the volume includes a number of photographs and lists of the men who served, including those who went on to join the regular forces as the war progressed.


Ireland, 19th Century Directories allows you to search across more than 120 volumes of fascinating Irish directories containing more than 74,000 records. A listing may reveal your ancestor's occupation, place of business and/or home address. The directories were published annually, which means that you may be able track your ancestor year by year. Most of the details in the directories were collected six months before publication; therefore, all the listings are six months old. The type of information recorded will vary depending on the publication and year although most will list the names of local gentry and professionals as well as merchants, traders, and, in some publications, local officials.

The records are presented as PDFs (portable digital files). This feature allows you to narrow your search by publication, year and page number. After selecting an image, you can read through the whole directory by using the previous and next buttons at the top of the image.

Thursday, November 17, 2016

The Scott Brothers (HGTV’s Property Brothers) Will Keynote RootsTech 2017

The Scott Brothers (HGTV’s Property Brothers) Will Keynote RootsTech 2017

Jonathan Scott and Drew Scott, who star in HGTV's “The Property Brothers,” will give RootsTech 2017 attendees unique insights into the role their family has had in their lives. The 6' 5" identical twin brothers will be the Thursday keynote speakers at RootsTech on February 9, 2017, in Salt Lake City, Utah. The popular brothers share passions for film and entertainment and for renovating older homes into dream homes. They have combined those passions to form an entertainment empire which became Scott Brothers Entertainment—an independent production company.

The Scott brothers garner HGTV’s highest ratings and are syndicated to major networks worldwide. Their first series, the Property Brothers, spun off several other series including Brother vs BrotherBuying and SellingProperty Brothers at Home, and Property Brothers at home on the Ranch. They recently authored their first book, Dream Home.

Their journey in entertainment includes much more than home improvement shows. Jonathan began performing in live theater and in TV and film as a child. He became a successful illusionist winning many awards and even performed live in Las Vegas. Drew was a high school basketball star and began acting in theater, improve, and sketch comedy in his teens. He even performed as a clown until he tired of the costumes and face paint.

The pair developed a passion for real estate as teens, purchasing their first fixer-upper house when they were 17. They did some renovations, and sold it a year later for a $50,000 profit to help support them as actors for a time before they decided to go back to college.

The Scott brothers were born in Vancouver, Canada. Their parents didn’t know they were going to have twins until the doctor saw Drew shortly after Jonathan was born. Because they lived on a ranch, Drew and Jonathan embraced the value of work at a young age—starting their first business at age seven. Their parents supported their various endeavors and encouraged them to pursue their dreams. “Our dad told us, ‘Don’t ever let anyone tell you that you can’t do something. Think of five ways you can do it, and then do it,’” Drew said, and that advice has become their mantra.

Both Drew and Jonathan are licensed real estate agents, but for their show, Drew is shown as the real estate agent and Jonathan as the contractor. Together they built their dream home in Las Vegas which has been featured on their series. The Scotts are involved in various philanthropic initiatives in North America and around the world.

At RootsTech, the brothers will talk about their unique family ties, and the can-do attitudes it fostered, their positive outlooks, and childhoods, their careers, their shared passions for buying and renovating property, and for the entertainment industry.

Find and share this release online at media.familysearch.org.

About RootsTech

RootsTech, hosted by FamilySearch, is a global conference celebrating families across generations, where people of all ages are inspired to discover and share their memories and connections. This annual event has become the largest of its kind in the world, attracting tens of thousands of participants worldwide.

Wednesday, November 16, 2016

Findmypast celebrates first anniversary of 1939 Register launch with millions of new records





Five million additional records now available to explore

The 1939 Register was launched online on November 2nd 2015 by Findmypast in association with The National Archives. Dubbed ‘The Wartime Domesday Book’, it is a comprehensive survey of the civil population of England and Wales at the onset of the Second World War. One year on, more than five million ‘closed records’ have been opened up and are now available to search.

November 16th 2016, one year on since the eagerly awaited 1939 Register was launched online by Findmypast, more than five million additional records have been made available, providing more people than ever before with the opportunity to discover details of their family, their home and their community.

In September 1939, just days after war had been declared, 65,000 enumerators were employed to visit every house in England and Wales to take stock of the civil population. The information that they recorded was used to issue Identity Cards, plan mass evacuations, establish rationing and co-ordinate other war-time provisions. In the longer term, the 1939 Register would go on to play a central role in the establishment of post-war services like the NHS.

The Register was updated in some cases until 1991, meaning that many people born less than 100 years ago but who had died prior to 1991 had their record opened automatically. Owing to data protection regulations, the personal details of people known to be born less than 100 years ago and still alive, had to be kept hidden. Records such as these were marked as ‘officially closed’ and, of the 41 million original records that make up the register, approximately 13 million (around 32%) were ‘closed’ at publication.

In the year since the Register was launched, Findmypast has matched millions of ‘closed records’ to multiple data sources to correctly confirm the date and location of death for individuals recorded. This process has resulted in more than three million records being opened in the past 12 months, while an additional two million records have been opened in the past week to mark the anniversary of the register’s launch.

The 1939 Register now contains more than 32.8 million open records that can now be accessed as part of a 12-month British or World subscription. Each record includes the names of inhabitants at each address, their date of birth, marital status and occupation. A wealth of contextual information, including period photographs never before seen online, infographics, region-specific newspaper articles and historical and contemporary maps, are personally tailored to each record, offering a rich and unique user experience unrivalled by any other family history research tool to date.

The 1939 Register is of particular significance for family historians as it bridges an important 30-year gap. The 1931 census was destroyed in the war and the 1941 census was never taken. The 1921 census will not be released until 2022.

Paul Nixon, military expert at Findmypast says: “It is fitting that the 1939 Register, so long a ‘living document’ that was continually updated by the NHS, is still very much alive now that is has been published by Findmypast. The opening up and release of a further five million records in the last 12 months means that more than ever before we can reach out to our recent past and discover where our ancestors were living, and what they were doing at the start of the Second World War.

Audrey Collins, family history records specialist at The National Archives says: “The 1939 Register has been a tremendous resource for family and local historians since it was released, and has become even better since then. As well as five million new records, and the addition of the 'Browse' function, there are unexpected finds: details of previous military service and unusual 'occupations' such as 'on holiday from Australia'. And the first two people in the whole register were called Mr and Mrs Start!

About Findmypast

Findmypast (previously DC Thomson Family History) is a British-owned world leader in online family history. It has an unrivalled record of online innovation in the field and 18 million registered users across its family of online brands, which includes Lives of the First World War, The British Newspaper Archive and Genes Reunited, amongst others.

Its lead brand, also called Findmypast, is a searchable online archive of over four billion family history records, ranging from parish records and censuses to migration records, military collections, historical newspapers and lots more. For members around the world, the site is a crucial resource for building family trees and conducting detailed historical research.

In April 2003, Findmypast was the first online genealogy site to provide access to the complete birth, marriage, and death indexes for England & Wales, winning the Queen’s Award for Innovation. Since that time, the company has digitised records from across the globe, including the 1911 Census which they digitised in association with The National Archives.

About The National Archives

The National Archives is one of the world’s most valuable resources for research. As the official archive and publisher for the UK government, and England and Wales they are the guardians of some of the UK's most iconic national documents, dating back over 1,000 years. Their role is to collect and secure the future of the government record, both digital and physical, to preserve it for generations to come, and to make it as accessible and available as possible. The National Archives brings together the skills and specialisms needed to conserve some of the oldest historic documents as well as leading digital archive practices to manage and preserve government information past, present and future.
http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/ http://www.legislation.gov.uk/

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Tuesday, November 15, 2016

New Historic Records Published at FamilySearch.org: Week of November 14, 2016



SALT LAKE CITY, UT—Check out the 11.8 million free, new records from the historic New York Passenger List indexes published this week! In addition, millions more immigration and other historic records were published from American Samoa, Brazil, Chile, Peru, South Africa, Venezuela, and the United States. Many thanks go to the diligent volunteer indexers around the world for completing these projects.

About FamilySearch and Its Historic Records Access Initiative

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world's historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org/indexing.

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,921 family history centers in 129 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.




Dedication Wall receives over 3000 submissions during Remembrance weekend

Dedication Wall receives over 3,000 submissions during Remembrance weekend


Dedication Wall receives over 3,000 submissions during Remembrance weekend

  • Military genealogy website Forces War Records created a unique Dedication Wall, launched for Remembrance Week
  • Over 3,000 personal dedications received during the Remembrance Weekend
  • Completely free to use, a permanent addition to the site
  • Public can upload a photo, plus a short dedication
  • A unique ‘sharing’ function allows the post to be shared directly from their dedication onto a choice of social sites
  • Helps with genealogy research by reaching out via social networks
  • ‘Search for record’ function from the wall

Visit the Dedication Wall: https://www.forces-war-records.co.uk/dedication-wall

Friday, November 11, 2016

Findmypast Friday - Over 2 Million British Military Records Available To Search



  • New collection of over 1.6 million gallantry medal records, over 171,000 Military Medal records and 551,000 Royal Navy Service records released online.
  • Records span 140 years of British military history and cover both world wars, the Napoleonic wars, Indian Mutiny, Crimea, Boer Wars and many more conflicts.
  • Over 1.5 million new Military newspaper articles and the Lower Canada Census 1825 also available to search.


Today, 11th November 2016, over 2 million records of British soldiers and sailors spanning more than 140 years of conflict have been published online at Findmypast.

The publication, released to coincide with Remembrance Day 2016, consists of Campaign, Gallantry & Long Service Medals & Awards, Royal Naval Reserve records, ships musters and Royal Navy & Marines service and pension records.

The majority of the new additions come from The National Archive’s Admiralty and War Office series (ADM & WO) and consist of both fully searchable transcripts and scanned colour images of original documents, including:

Britain, Campaign, Gallantry & Long Service Medals & Awards

Findmypast has released a new collection of more than 1.6 million records of British Army, Royal Marines, Royal Navy, and Merchant Navy personnel who were recognised for their service, courage, and accomplishments in times of war and conflict. The awards include, in part, Military Medals, Distinguished Conduct Medals, Waterloo Medals, Merchant Navy Medals, and the Victoria Cross Award, the premier award for gallantry.

The new Britain, Campaign, Gallantry & Long Service Medals & Awards collection was created by merging 171,000 new Military Medal 1914-1920 records with Findmypast’s existing medal collections to form a single, comprehensive search experience. The records list the details of men and women who showed exceptional courage and fortitude in the face of danger and contains records from both world wars as well as the Peninsular War, Indian Mutiny, Waterloo, and many more conflicts.

British Royal Navy, Ships' Musters

This collection of over 280,000 muster rolls is an excellent resource for genealogists looking to find seafaring ancestors in the Royal Navy before service records began in 1853. Covering the years 1739 to 1861, the muster roll books recorded the names and birth details of every person present on board a ship and were kept on an 8-week basis for accounting and administrative reasons.

British Royal Naval Reserve 1899-1930

British Royal Naval Reserve 1899-1930 consists of over 81,000 service cards of officers and ratings who served with the RNR. The records list the names, ranks and dates of service of RNR personnel as well as details of awards, promotions and notes on their character and behaviour during combat.
The RNR is an amalgamation of the Royal Naval Reserve, created in 1859, and the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve, created in 1903. The two forces were merged in 1958. At the beginning of the First World War, the RNR had 30,000 officers and men. Sailors within the RNR served at the Battle of Coronel, the Battle of Jutland, and in Gallipoli. Many others boarded trawlers searching for mines.

British Royal Navy & Royal Marines Service and Pension Records, 1704-1919

Over 185,000 records have just been released in the second phase of Findmypast’s Royal Navy & Royal Marines Service and Pension Records, 1704-1919 collection. The collection consists of an assortment of documents kept by the Greenwich Hospital and the Royal Hospital Chelsea to record the details of Greenwich Pensioners and spans over 230 years of British naval history from to 1704 to 1934.

The records allow family historians to uncover fascinating details of their ancestor’s career with the Royal Navy, such as their period of service, where they served, when they joined and if they were wounded in the line of duty.

The new additions will be free to search until midnight on Sunday. Findmypast has made their entire collection of more than 70 million world military records free until 23.59 GMT 13th November to allow family historians from around the globe the opportunity to uncover the stories of the military heroes within their own family.

Paul Nixon, military expert at Findmypast, says: Findmypast has consolidated all its medal collections under a single search AND released a new collection: Military Medal awards 1914-1920, the most comprehensively indexed version of this Military Medal available online. Family historians can now access all our medal records through one search to easily uncover the stories of those ancestors who sacrificed so much.

As an island nation we owe a huge debt of gratitude to the men and women who have served Great Britain at sea. Our new naval records will open up fresh lines of enquiry for thousands of people and cement Findmypast’s reputation for having the most comprehensive online collection of British naval records.”

Other new additions available to search this Findmypast Friday

Military Newspapers

Over 1.5 million new articles have been added to military publications available in our collection of historic British Newspapers. One new title has been added, The Naval & Military Gazette and Weekly Chronicle of the United Service, and additional articles have been added to the Army and Navy Gazette.

Lower Canada Census 1825

The Lower Canada Census 1825 contains over 74,000 records covering modern day Labrador and southern Quebec. Each search result will provide you will an image of the original document and a transcript revealing the language your ancestor spoke, where they lived and with how many people they lived.

About Findmypast

Findmypast (previously DC Thomson Family History) is a British-owned world leader in online family history. It has an unrivalled record of online innovation in the field and 18 million registered users across its family of online brands, which includes Lives of the First World War, The British Newspaper Archive and Genes Reunited, amongst others.

Its lead brand, also called Findmypast, is a searchable online archive of over two billion family history records, ranging from parish records and censuses to migration records, military collections, historical newspapers and lots more. For members around the world, the site is a crucial resource for building family trees and conducting detailed historical research.

In April 2003, Findmypast was the first online genealogy site to provide access to the complete birth, marriage, and death indexes for England & Wales, winning the Queen’s Award for Innovation. Since that time, the company has digitised records from across the globe, including major collections from Britain, Ireland, Australia, and the United States.

Wednesday, November 9, 2016

Findmypast Grants Four Days of Free Access to All Military Records for Veterans Day 2016


  • Findmypast makes entire collection of more than 70 million world military records free for four days
  • All UK, Irish, Australian, Canadian and US military records free from the 10th to the 13th November 2016
  • Includes free access to over 43 million US and Canada military records


Leading family history website, Findmypast, has just announced that they will be making their entire collection of military records free for four days to coincide with Veterans Day 2016.

From 04:00 EST, 10th November until 18:59 GMT, 13th November 2016, all 70 million records within Findmypast’s “Military, Armed Forces and Conflict” category will be completely free to search and explore, providing family historians from around the globe the opportunity to uncover the stories of the military heroes within their own family. This will include free access to:

  • Over 43 million US and Canada military records
  • Over 1.3 million United States Army enlistment records
  • Over 1.1 million United States Civil War Pension File Index records
  • Over 89,000 Revolutionary War Pensions
  • Millions of Civil War soldiers, sailors, veterans and medal records.
  • Millions of records covering US forces in Korea, Vietnam and WW2
  • Over 26.4 million British military Records including the most comprehensive collection of British Army service records both for WW1 and pre WW1 - these multiple page documents were released in partnership with The National Archives and are packed with fascinating biographical details such as the names and addresses of next of kin, physical descriptions and character references from commanding officers
  • The most comprehensive British Royal Navy and Royal Air Force collections available online
  • Over 2.6 million POW records in our exclusive Prisoners of War 1715-1945 collection.
  • Over 1.1 million WW2 casualty records
  • Soldiers Died In The Great War 1914-1919 records
  • Over 1.5 million medal index cards, memorial rolls and roll of honour records
  • Military tribunal records - the records of thousands of men who attempted to avoid conscription
  • Military Nurses 1856-1994 records


Free Live Webinar

On Friday November 11th at 11:00 EST, Findmypast will be hosting a free Remembrance Day Webinar presented by in-house military expert, Paul Nixon. In “Unpicking the past: revealing secrets in old military photographs”, Mr Nixon will demonstrate how anyone can turn detective using old military photographs, military records and historic newspapers to uncover clues which in turn open up further avenues of research.

Learn more at: http://www.findmypast.com/military-records

About Findmypast

Findmypast (previously DC Thomson Family History) is a British-owned world leader in online family history. It has an unrivalled record of online innovation in the field and 18 million registered users across its family of online brands, which includes Lives of the First World War, The British Newspaper Archive and Genes Reunited, amongst others.

Its lead brand, also called Findmypast, is a searchable online archive of over two billion family history records, ranging from parish records and censuses to migration records, military collections, historical newspapers and lots more. For members around the world, the site is a crucial resource for building family trees and conducting detailed historical research.

In April 2003, Findmypast was the first online genealogy site to provide access to the complete birth, marriage, and death indexes for England & Wales, winning the Queen’s Award for Innovation. Since that time, the company has digitised records from across the globe, including major collections from Britain, Ireland, Australia, and the United States.

Tuesday, November 8, 2016

Leadership Expert Liz Wiseman to Keynote RootsTech Innovator Summit


Salt Lake City, Utah, (8 November 2016)—Do you multiply or diminish intelligence? Liz Wiseman, a leadership strategist, best-selling author, and inspiring speaker whose recent clients include Disney, Microsoft, eBay and PayPal, Google, and Facebook, is excited to share highlights of what she has learned as the keynote speaker for the 2017 Innovator Summit at RootsTech. Innovator Summit is a one-day event for developers, entrepreneurs, and innovators who want to explore business and technological opportunities in the multibillion dollar family history industry. The Innovator Summit will be held on February 8, 2017 at the Salt Palace Convention Center in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Leadership Expert Liz Wiseman to Keynote RootsTech Innovator Summit
Liz Wiseman teaches leadership to executives and emerging leaders around the world. She is the founder and president of the Wiseman Group, a leadership research and development firm headquartered in Silicon Valley. She has been listed on the biennial Thinkers50 ranking for 2013 and 2015 and named one of the top 10 leadership thinkers in the world.

Wiseman is the author of three best-selling books: Rookie Smarts: Why Learning Beats Knowing in the New Game of Work; Multipliers: How the Best Leaders Make Everyone Smarter; and The Multiplier Effect: Tapping the Genius Inside Our Schools.

She has spent years working around a lot of really smart executives in tech industries and conducted significant research in the field of leadership. She's observed how some leaders actually shut down the brain power of people around them.

"Yet, other leaders seem to amplify the intelligence of people around them," said Wiseman. "These leaders were intelligence multipliers." She said that “when these leaders walked into a room, it was as if you could see lightbulbs going off over people’s heads, and ideas flowed and problems got solved.”

Wiseman has emphasized that one of the most important aspects that she learned in this research was “that when we linger too long on a plateau a little part of us dies inside. But when we step out of the space of knowing—where we are fully capable—and step into unfamiliar territory, we feel alive. I think it is actually where we feel divine, and, in some ways, I feel like it is where we see God’s hand working in our lives.”

Wiseman is a frequent lecturer at BYU, Stanford University, and the Naval Postgraduate Academy. She is a former executive at Oracle Corporation, where she worked over the course of 17 years as the vice president of Oracle University and as the global leader for human resource development. During her tenure at Oracle, she led several major global initiatives and has worked and traveled in over 40 countries. She writes for Harvard Business Review and Fortune. Her work has appeared in The Wall Street Journal, Fast Company, Entrepreneur, Inc., and Time.

The RootsTech Innovator Summit keynote session begins at 9:00 a.m., followed by a full day of classes, the semifinal round of the RootsTech Innovator Showdown, a networking social, and other related activities.

The annual Innovator Showdown contest is designed to foster innovation in the family history industry. Twelve semi-finalists will be chosen and announced, with $100,000 in cash and in-kind prizes offered by sponsors to the winners.

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About RootsTech

RootsTech, hosted by FamilySearch, is a global conference celebrating families across generations, where people of all ages are inspired to discover and share their memories and connections. This annual event has become the largest of its kind in the world, attracting tens of thousands of participants worldwide.

What TheGenealogist has in store for 2017


2017 is going to see millions of new records added to TheGenealogist across a wide variety of collections.

New Data Sets

We are adding millions of new and unique Parish Records and Bishops’ Transcripts are being added for many more counties.

A new and unique record set covering detailed records of our ancestors houses, which will be searchable by name, address and area, with high resolution maps showing the property.

Our ongoing project with The National Archives is set to release yet more detailed Colour County and Tithe Maps with tags to show where your ancestors lived.

We are releasing a 1921 census substitute, using a wide variety of records including Trade and Residential Directories of the time.

New decades of BT27 Passenger Lists and Emigration Records will become available.

Our International Headstone Project will be expanded with more Commonwealth Cemeteries added.

More worldwide War Memorials added to our comprehensive database.

Following on from our release of over 230 million U.S. records in 2016, we will be launching more U.S. records in 2017.

New & Improved Census Images

Thanks to new technology and new Silver Halide Film provided by The National Archives, we have now been able to re-scan the 1891 census with improved resolution and quality. This combination of improved readability and new transcripts will help locate your ancestors and view the relevant images with a superior grayscale format. Our “Deep Zoom” images have over 5 times the resolution of previous images. They will be lightening fast to view thanks to the technology used in our new image interface. We will launch these new images in early 2017.

Look out for these exciting new developments and more in 2017 at TheGenealogist.co.uk

National Genealogical Society Welcomes New Editor of NGS Magazine


ARLINGTON, VA, 7 November 2016—The National Genealogical Society (NGS) is pleased to announce the appointment of Deb Cyprych as editor of NGS Magazine. Cyprych comes to NGS with a wealth of experience as an award-winning editor and as a seasoned professional genealogist.



NGS Magazine—a quarterly print and digital publication—updates members on NGS activities and provides genealogists with specific information and guidance on conducting effective genealogical research. Articles feature genealogical records, collections, and repositories; research techniques and methodologies; databases; case studies; and genealogical problem-solving techniques. Regular columns discuss National Archives records, technology, genetic genealogy, and reference topics.

During her twenty years of editing genealogical periodicals, Cyprych has won several awards, including three from NGS, for her work as editor of The Tracer, a journal published by the Hamilton County (Ohio) Genealogical Society, and as co-editor of the Ohio Genealogical Society’s Ohio Genealogy News. She has written numerous articles on genealogical resources, is the author of an award-winning family history book, and served as the chair of the NGS Blog Committee for the Society’s 2012 Family History Conference in Cincinnati, Ohio.

“It’s an honor to be selected as editor of NGS Magazine,” Cyprych said. “I’m excited about the opportunity to use my passion for genealogy and my editing experience to solicit articles from expert authors and collaborate with them for the benefit of our readers. I welcome submission of articles that appeal to a variety of interests and skill levels while delivering content useful to all.”

Cyprych has been a professional genealogist since 2002. Her specialty areas include researching Cincinnati families and German families in any locale and timeframe; conducting lineage society research, providing documentation, and writing proof arguments; and combining social history with genealogical facts to create engaging family history narratives. She has studied at the Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy and the Genealogical Research Institute of Pittsburgh and has attended numerous conferences hosted by NGS and other organizations. She lives in Cincinnati.

Founded in 1903, the National Genealogical Society is dedicated to genealogical education, exemplary standards of research, and the preservation of genealogical records. The Arlington, Virginia, based nonprofit is the premier national society for everyone, from the beginner to the most advanced family historian, seeking excellence in publications, educational offerings, and guidance in research. It also offers many opportunities to interact with other genealogists. Please visit the NGS Pressroom for further information.

Friday, November 4, 2016

New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday, November 4, 2016


Over 2.8 million additional records are available to search this Findmypast Friday, including:


Over 2.7 million additional records have been added to our collection of United States Marriages. The new additions come from 13 different states and include significant updates from Alabama, Florida, Illinois, Kentucky, Ohio and Rhode Island.

The records include transcripts and images of the original documents that list marriage date, the names of the bride and groom, birthplace, birth date, age and residence as well as fathers' and mothers' names.


Explore more than 33,000 records containing the details of military personnel who served overseas with the United States' Naval Group China, the US Navy's intelligence unit in China during World War II. The records consist of muster roll reports created by the Department of the Navy, U.S. Naval Group China (NGC) to record locations and changes made to ranks and rates of pay for naval personnel.

The records contained in this collection relate to those persons attached to the NGC and provide names, ranks or rates of pay, branches of service, muster roll dates of reporting or detachment, and duty locations approximately every two weeks. As such, naval officers and sailors may appear multiple times in the records, tracking changes in an individual's location, unit, rank or rate of pay over the course of the war.


1840 U.S. Census, Revolutionary War Veterans contains over 21,000 records of ex-servicemen and their next of kin who were receiving pensions in 1840 for service in the Revolutionary War.

On the back of the population schedules for the 1840 census, enumerators recorded the living pensioners of the Revolutionary War as well as other military service. The lists also noted an individual's age and the name of the head of household in which the individual lived.


New Zealand Wars, officers and men killed 1860-1870 consists of 193 transcripts of nominal returns of colonial officers and men who were killed in action while fighting in the Maori Wars. The Māori Wars, began as a result of contested land purchases by the colonial government.

At that time, the colonial government believed that the Māori resistance had unified to both block future land sales and deny Crown sovereignty and, as a result, the government brought in thousands of troops to combat the Māori King Movement (Kīngitanga) and possess their lands for British settlers. Each transcript will list your ancestor's date of death, rank and corps.


Find out if your ancestor was eligible for a military pension and uncover details of their next of kin with a collection of over 5,000 transcripts recording former servicemen who were eligible for military pensions between 1900 and 1902.

This index will not only allow you to learn if your ancestor's rank, service number and whether they qualified for a pension, but also the name and address of their next of kin, often including the relationship between the next of kin and your ancestor.


Explore this 168 page document to uncover the history of the Royal Hibernian Military School in Dublin. This fascinating publication includes transcriptions from memorial inscriptions, a roll of honour from the First World War, and transcripts from both the 1901 and 1911 census.

The Royal Hibernian Military School was founded in 1765 in Phoenix Park, Dublin. Today, it is the site of St Mary's Hospital. When the school closed in 1924, all the registers and minute books were taken to Walworth, London. However, during the Second World War, these documents were destroyed in the Blitz. The Ireland, Royal Hibernian Military school history provides a valuable substitute for the records that were lost.


Ireland Military Records is comprised of 8 different Irish military publications and contains over 2,700 records. The collection includes memorial inscriptions, army lists from the 19th and 17th centuries as well as two volumes of popular novels written by Charles Lever.

Each record is displayed as a PDF (Portable document format). The detail found in each record will vary depending on the publication and the subject.


Thursday, November 3, 2016

BCG WEBINAR - “Civil Law Notaries: Using Notarial Records to Build a Family History” by Melanie D. Holtz, CG

BCG OFFERS FREE WEBINAR Tuesday, November 15, 8:00 p.m. Eastern

“Civil Law Notaries: Using Notarial Records to Build a Family History” by Melanie D. Holtz, CG

Notarial records—legal documents created by civil law notaries—are a valuable resource in areas of the world such as Louisiana, Mexico, French Canada, and Italy. Property deeds (land, personal, or agricultural), mortgages, wills, dowries, late birth registrations, marriage permissions, and many other types of documents can be found within this record set. These records often provide key details about a family, their relationships, and financial transactions which cannot be found within any other type of genealogical resource.

Understanding the procedures behind the preparation of these documents is key to understanding their method of conservation, the formats the documents will be found in, and the contents therein. This lecture will provide examples of several Italian and French documents that are particularly descriptive and which provide key details on the families being researched.

The Board for Certification of Genealogists (BCG) will present “Civil Law Notaries: Using Notarial Records to Build a Family History” by Melanie D. Holtz, CG, free to the public at 8:00 p.m. EDT, 15 November 2016.

Melanie D. Holtz, CG, is a board-certified genealogist, lecturer, and writer with a specialty in Italian genealogy and Italian-American dual citizenship. With offices in both the U.S. and Italy, she provides her clients with a wide range of services, including Italian ancestral tours. Melanie is also a co-administrator of the Virtual Institute of Genealogical Research and the author of several courses on Italian genealogy available through Family Tree University and the National Institute for Genealogical Studies.

President Jeanne Larzalere Bloom, CG, says “The Board for Certification of Genealogists is proud to offer this new webinar as part of an ongoing series that supports our mission to provide education for family historians. This webinar will address genealogy standards for research. By promoting a uniform standard of competence and ethics the BCG endeavors to foster public confidence in genealogy.”

Register for “Civil Law Notaries: Using Notarial Records to Build a Family History” by Melanie D. Holtz, CG, before 15 November 2016 at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3105017916039030787

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. For more information contact: office@BCGcertification.org.

View BCG’s past Legacy webinars at http://familytreewebinars.com/bcg and http://bcgcertification.org/blog/bcg-webinars. For more information on BCG’s education opportunities, please visit: http://www.BCGcertification.org/certification/educ.html.

Tuesday, November 1, 2016

ISFHWE 2017 Excellence-in-Writing Competition is now open for entries


The International Society of Family History Writers and Editors (ISFHWE) is reminding writers IN ALL MEDIA (magazines, newspapers, journals, websites, blogs) that the 2017 Excellence-in-Writing Competition is now open for entries through 15 June 2017.

The competition is open to both MEMBERS and NON-MEMBERS of ISFHWE; both published and non-published authors may enter (see category list below). Members of ISFHWE receive a discount on the entry fee (after logging in to the ISFHWE members’ corner; new members allow up to ten days to receive login information). The categories are:

Category I – Columns. This is for columns of original content, published on a regular basis, in any medium, published in 2016. Each entry must consist of 2,000 words or fewer. These are entries from the author’s regular column-not features. Note that these may be print or online columns (including blogs).
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Category II -- Articles. These one-time articles (not part of the author’s column) must have been published in 2016 in a journal, magazine, newsletter, blog or website. Entries cannot exceed 5,000 words. Note that these may be print or online articles, including GUEST entries on a blog. Footnotes are not included in the word count.

Category III – Genealogy Newsletter. This category is for society or family association newsletters published in 2016. Entries should consist of two issues, each submitted as a single file in PDF format. The judging will be based on originality, content, visual appeal, writing and editing quality, and accuracy. The award is to the editor of the publication. These may be print or online newsletters. The once-a-year newsletters usually sent at Christmas do not qualify for this competition as two issues from the same calendar year are needed.

Category IV –Unpublished Authors. Entrants in this category aspire to be published writers or columnists in the field of genealogy, family or local history. The submissions in this category are original and unpublished, between 500 and 2,000 words. Since these are UNPUBLISHED, blogs are not eligible for this category. The articles should be unpublished at the time they were submitted to the competition.

Category V– Unpublished material - Published Authors. This category is for original unpublished genealogically related articles by previously published authors. Entries should be between 500 and 3,000 words. Since these are UNPUBLISHED, blogs are not eligible for this category. The articles should be unpublished at the time they were submitted to the competition.

Category VI – Poetry/Song Lyrics. This category is for original content (published in 2016 or unpublished), that is related to family history. Entries should be no longer than 1000 words and have a title. This may include song lyrics (music is not judged).

Winners (1st, 2nd, 3rd) in each category will be awarded a cash prize and a certificate. Certificates may be awarded for Honorable Mentions. The awards will be announced in September 2017.

Entries must be submitted in PDF, Word, WordPerfect, or JPG format by e-mail in time to meet this deadline. Please note: Footnotes will not count toward word count. Send entries to: Competition@ISFHWE.org

Appropriate entry fee(s) - and membership dues to receive the discount - may be paid via PayPal on the ISFHWE website at ISFHWE.org. Full information on the competition is available on the ISFHWE website in the “2017 Excellence-in-Writing Competition - Information and Online Entry Form” link, which leads to: http://www.isfhwe.org/competition.php. For questions, contact the Competition Coordinator at: Competition@ISFHWE.org

FamilySearch New Historic Records Update: Week of October 31, 2016



SALT LAKE CITY, UT—Search free, newly published death records this week from Oregon, Kentucky, and Tennessee at FamilySearch.org. Also, check out new German civil registrations, and millions of browsable digital images for North Carolina estate files, Revolutionary War rosters, and GenealogyBank obituaries. See and share the detailed list of this week's new additions online at media.familysearch.org.

About FamilySearch and Its Historic Records Access Initiative

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world's historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org/indexing.

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,921 family history centers in 129 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.




2017 International Germanic Genealogy ‘Connections’ Conference Features All-Star Lineup of Speakers

Roger Minert

Dirk Weissleder

MINNEAPOLIS, Minn.—An all-star lineup of speakers, including well-known international figures, is slated for the 2017 International Germanic Genealogy Conference, set for July 28-30 in Minneapolis, Minn.

Among 39 confirmed presenters are figures including Roger Minert, Ernest Thode, Dirk Weissleder of Germany, Baerbel Johnson, Fritz Juengling, Michael Lacopo, James Beidler, Paula Stuart-Warren, Teresa Steinkamp McMillin, Jill Morelli and Stephen Morse.

Other international presenters include Ursula Krause, Werner Esser and Timo Kracke, all of Germany, and Benjamin Hollister of Australia.

The conference — “CONNECTIONS: International. Cultural. Personal.” — will offer 70 presentations over three full days.

Presentations on regional specialties include Ostfriesen, Luxembourg, Palatinate, Bremen, Alsace, Baden, Black Sea Germans, Austria, Czech Republic (Bohemia), Pomerania, West Prussia, East Prussia, Lithuania, eastern Europe, former eastern German provinces, Australia, and others.

Daily “Connections” sessions are planned for attendees to meet others with common interests in specific Germanic regions.

The “Connections” focus of this international conference also offers a unique opportunity for Germanic genealogists to make personal connections with people from other countries as well as nationally, said officials of the German-American Genealogical Partnership, which is organizing the conference.

For the full lineup of speakers and other conference information, visit the website of the Minnesota-based Germanic Genealogy Society, conference host, at www.GGSMN.org, click “2017 GAGP Conference.”

Reservations are open for booking rooms at special conference rates at the Minneapolis Marriott Northwest Hotel in Brooklyn Park, Minn., venue for the conference. Call the special room reservation line at (877) 303-1681 and say you are attending the Germanic Genealogy Conference. Or reserve online at http://TinyURL.com/HLUWQQJ . Reserve early to ensure availability.

Registration for the conference opens in January 2017. The conference registration fee, to be announced soon, will be affordable and in line with other major genealogy conferences.

The German-American Genealogical Partnership, founded in 2015, joins Germanic genealogy societies across America, Germany, Canada, England and other European countries, and continues to draw new societies worldwide. Partnership members include the 60+ societies belonging to the Germany-based Deutsche Arbeitsgemeinschaft Genealogischer Verbände, whose leadership helped found the Partnership.