New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday, February 24, 2017


Over 455,000 new records are available to search this Findmypast Friday, including;


Northamptonshire Baptisms contains over 14,000 transcripts of original baptism records and covers 34 parishes across the East Midlands county. These records have been transcribed by the Northamptonshire Family History Society from parish registers found at the Northamptonshire Record Office and cover the years 1559 through to 1901

The level of detail found each transcript may vary although most will include a combination of your ancestor’s baptism date, baptism place, the names of both parent’s, document reference, page and entry number.


The Northampton General Hospital was founded in 1744 by Dr James Stonhouse and supported by local benefactors who paid for patient’s treatments through subscriptions. Today, the Northampton General Hospital is still providing healthcare as part of the NHS Trust.

This collection consists of over 126,000 transcripts of original admission registers held by the Northamptonshire record office. These transcripts will not only allow you to discover whether your ancestors were admitted to the hospital, but also when they were admitted, why they were admitted and the year they were discharged. Most records will also reveal the nature of your ancestor’s ailment and the outcome of their treatment.


Over 54,000 records covering more than 1,800 counties have been added to our collection of United States marriage records including substantial updates from Alabama, California, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, Ohio and Tennessee. Released in partnership with FamilySearch international, these new additions mark the latest phase of efforts to create the single largest online collection of U.S. marriage records in history.

Each record include transcripts and images of the original documents that list marriage date, the names of the bride and groom, birthplace, birth date, age, residence as well as fathers' and mothers' names. The entire collection now contains over 168 million records and continues to grow.


Warwickshire Monumental Inscriptions is an index containing over 201,000 transcripts. Each record will list your ancestor’s birth year, death year and the location of the monument.


Over 60,000 articles and 10 new titles have been added to the Periodical Source Index this month. PERSI enables you to easily locate key information about people and places through millions of entries from thousands of historical, genealogical and ethnic publications.

PERSI provides access to articles, photos, and other material you might not find using traditional search methods. This can help to build the historical context around your personal research, and the world your ancestors lived in.

8-year-old author publishes book to strengthen families


8-year-old author publishes book to strengthen families
New e-book offers specific ideas for family laughter and play

www.legacytale.com— Silliness may be the new watchword for healthy families. A recent publication by a young author calls on the power of play to strengthen bonds:

The How To Be Silly Book: 11 easy ways to have more fun and grow closer as a family

Written and illustrated by 8-year-old Rebecca Robison, (known as Little Sister in the Legacy Tale family on social media), the book gives eleven simple, concrete ideas- complete with descriptive artwork- for playing together as a family.

The young author feels so strongly about the role of laughter and play in families that she decided to write her own tutorial. She says, “My dad tells me every day how silly I am. I think being silly helps us be closer and happier as a family. Because silliness leads to laughter and play, which results in more love and happiness. PLUS, silliness always cures the grumpies!”

With ideas from “play Twister” to “eat dessert for dinner” and a laugh-out-loud tutorial for "tickling," the book’s instructions are suitable for family members of all ages, including multiple generations and extended family. Most of the ideas are very simple to implement, requiring little or no preparation or expense. The focus is on family time spent intentionally, making memories and building bonds. Making memories- and keeping them- lines right up with the family’s business, Legacy Tale.

An avid writer and illustrator, this is not Miss Robison’s first completed book, but it is the first to be offered for sale to the public. She spread her working time on this publication across three months- developing the concept, creating the drawings with colored pencils and markers, then writing the text. “I’m excited to earn money for college,” says the third grader.

At a price of $5.99, the e-book is available for purchase in PDF format from the family’s website: http://www.legacytale.com/how-to-be-silly-book/

About Legacy Tale

Legacy Tale was founded in 2015 by Hilarie and Ben Robison. With a core business of custom interviewing, writing, editing and publishing heirloom family books, they also provide e-books and online courses for DIYers. The blog at www.legacytale.com is a robust resource of free content focused on making and keeping memories, including how to capture and preserve family narratives and photos.

New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday, February 17, 2017


Over 6.3 million records are available to search this Findmypast Friday including;


Norfolk Bishop's transcripts contain over 647,000 records. Each entry includes an image of the original document and a transcript of the vital details. The amount of information found in the transcript will depend on the age and condition of the original document although most will include your ancestor's name, baptism year, baptism place and the names of their parent's. Images may reveal additional information such as your ancestor's birth date, father's occupation and the name of the officiating minister.


Norfolk Bishop's Transcripts Marriages contains Over 157,000 records. Each record includes a transcript that will reveal your ancestor's birth year, date of marriage, place of marriage and the name of their spouse as well as an image of the original document. Images may reveal further information about your ancestor's marriage, such as the couple's occupations, fathers' names, and the names of any witnesses.


Search over 434,000 Bishop's transcripts of Norfolk burials to discover your ancestor's final resting place. Transcripts will also reveal when they died and their age at death. Images of original documents may reveal additional information such as the name of the minister who performed the ceremony, your ancestor's date of death and, occasionally, their cause of death.


Norfolk Electoral Registers 1832-1915 contains over 4.5 million records. Each entry includes an image of the original register and a transcript of the facts listed. Transcripts will list your ancestor's name, the place they registered, the district and the year they were registered. Images will provide additional information such as you’re their address and the type of property they owned or rented.


British Royal Navy Allotment Declarations 1795-1852 contains over 485,000 records held by The National Archives at Kew. Each record includes a transcripts that will reveal your ancestor's rank, the year of their declaration, their pay book number, their relationship the recipient and any additional remarks. Images may reveal where and when they were married, the names, ages, and baptism dates of their children, the allotted individuals residence, the allotment date and where payable. Prior to 1853, men joined the navy on a short-term basis and service records were not created until after 1853. Allotment Declarations are an excellent way to trace the careers of your earlier naval ancestors.


Over 104,000 records have been added to our collection of Victoria Births. These civil registration records will reveal your ancestors birth place, birth year, parent's names and registration number. The entire collection now contains over 1.9 million records spanning the years 1837 t0 1917. During this period, Victoria's birth certificates – as well as marriage and death certificates – were the most detailed of all Australian colonies'. Ordered copies of original certificates may contain additional information such as the parents' ages, place of birth, marriage details and the details of any previous children.


Over 1.6 million articles and 13 brand new titles have been added to our collection of historic British newspapers this month. The new additions cover the North West and South East of England a number of Scottish counties, Nottinghamshire and Bournemouth. The new Scottish titles include the Haddingtonshire Courier, Linlithgowshire Gazette, Ross-shire Journal, Rothesay Chronicle, Kinross-shire Advertiser, Peeblesshire Advertiser and the Scottish Referee.

Announcing The Journal of Genealogy & Family History


Launching in April 2017, the new Journal of Genealogy and Family History (JGFH) will address the current need for a high quality, peer reviewed publication, covering broad scholarly research in genealogy and family history in a 21st century online format. The journal will be offered to readers and contributors for free, on an open-access, non-commercial basis, with content available under a Creative Commons Attribution License. The scope of the journal will include any field or academic discipline associated with genealogy or family history research such as heraldry, demography, education and record conservation.

Articles will offer the reader insights into current thinking and practice and provide an outlet for theoretical and speculative ideas within genealogy and family history. Topics will be wide ranging, and include for example:

  • Family histories which demonstrate new and innovative approaches and analytic techniques;
  • Locational studies
  • The use of new technologies
  • Software applications and databases
  • The use of DNA analyses to better understand kinship
  • Ancestry and populations
  • Micro histories which may focus on personal, local, community and social histories.
  • Ethical and legal issues surrounding the practice of genealogy


The journal will attract authors from around the world who wish to have their genealogical and family history work published in a credible form and made available to anyone who chooses to read it. All articles submitted for publication will undergo anonymous peer review, which will provide a rigorous and robust process of close scrutiny.

The Editor, Jessica Feinstein, says: "I am very excited to be part of the great team involved in this venture, and look forward to enabling authors in our field to publish academic articles that will advance genealogical research in many areas."

The editorial board will include prominent individuals from within the field of genealogy and family history as well as associated disciplines. The Journal of Genealogy and Family History is registered at the British Library with ISSN 2399-2964.

The journal was initiated and designed by the Register of Qualified Genealogists and will be published via their website at: http://www.qualifiedgenealogists.org/jgfh

Discover Two of our Nation’s Important Repositories in Madison, Wisconsin


ARLINGTON, VA, 15 FEBRUARY 2017—The National Genealogical Society (NGS) opens registration today for family historians to participate in on-site orientations in genealogical research at the Wisconsin Historical Society (WHS) Library and Archives and the Max Kade Institute for German-American Studies, 24-28 July 2017.

The WHS Library and Archives’ genealogy and history collections are among our nation’s most extensive repositories and reflect the diversity of the people who have lived or passed through its territory. Native American tribes, French-Canadians, Northern Europeans—primarily from Germany and Norway—African Americans, Asians, and Hispanics have called Wisconsin home. The state has also seen the rise and diminution of miners, loggers, and railroad workers, and once held Confederate prisoners of war during the Civil War. Dedicated to preserving history, the Society’s more than four million records extend beyond Wisconsin to the rest of the United States and to Canada. Its Draper collection’s 491 volumes (ca. 1775-1815) concentrates on the area known as "Trans-Allegheny West," including the western Carolinas and Virginia, some portions of Georgia and Alabama, the entire Ohio River valley, and parts of the Mississippi River valley. Its collection of newspapers, journals, magazines, and union and guilds publications from around the country is only surpassed by the Library of Congress. The WHS also serves as Wisconsin State Archives that includes state, county, and local government records. Land deeds, naturalization records, tax rolls, and court documents are just some of the original records that genealogists can access at the Archives.

Family historians with ancestors from Germany will be especially interested in the Max Kade Institute’s robust collection of German-American newspapers, letters, diaries, and church and business records. The Institute is also an excellent resource for locating historic German-language, European towns and villages.

Space is limited for this new NGS research trip. Experienced, BCG certified genealogists will introduce and mentor a group of 20 individuals as they explore the wealth of data at both facilities. Participants will also have ample time to conduct their own personal research during this four-day trip in Madison, Wisconsin, 24-28 July 2017.

Research consultants Rev. David McDonald, DMin, CGSM, and Patricia Walls Stamm, CG, CGLSM, will insure that your introduction to these institutions is both productive and enriching.

The trip includes:

  • Guidance from leading experts
  • Online orientation
  • Meet and greet on Monday afternoon at the hotel
  • Four days of research
  • Orientation at the repositories
  • Personal research consultations with group leaders throughout the trip
  • Four nights at the Lowell Center, including daily continental breakfast and free internet in rooms
  • Fees, taxes, and gratuities

Make your reservation quickly so you don’t miss out on this research trip. Space is limited to only 20 individuals. To make your reservation or to learn more, visit http://www.ngsgenealogy.org/cs/conferences_events/research_trips/wi_research_trip

About the National Genealogical Society

Founded in 1903, the National Genealogical Society is dedicated to genealogical education, the highest standards of research, and the preservation of genealogical records. The Arlington, Virginia, based nonprofit is the premier national society for everyone, from the beginner to the most advanced family historian, seeking excellence in publications, educational offerings, and guidance in research. It also offers many opportunities to interact with other genealogists.

The Ohio Genealogical Society Enters Partnership with Findmypast to Benefit OGS Members!

BELLVILLE, OH 13 February 2017—The Ohio Genealogical Society (OGS) has made a special arrangement with Findmypast (FMP), one of the leading genealogical records companies, to provide OGS members a free, one-year subscription to Findmypast US and Canada collection.

Members can use this opportunity to extend their own FMP US and Canada subscriptions beyond their current expiration date. Also available to OGS members is a one-year subscription to Findmypast World collection at a significantly discounted rate.

Current and new OGS members are encouraged to visit the OGS website for additional details and to take advantage of this limited-time offer.

The Ohio Genealogical Society Enters Partnership with Findmypast to Benefit OGS Members!

Findmypast is an international leader in online family history and genealogical research with customers and operations in the United States, United Kingdom, Ireland, and Australia. Its searchable online archive includes more than two billion family history records—from parish records and censuses to migration records, military collections, historical newspapers, the Periodical Source Index (PERSI), and lots more. For members around the world, the site is a valuable resource for building family trees and making family connections through its historical records and advanced search tools.

About Ohio Genealogical Society

Founded in 1959, the Ohio Genealogical Society is the largest state genealogical society in the United States. Its mission is to meet the educational needs of its members and the general public through the acquisition, preservation, and dissemination of genealogical and historical information. More details can be found online at www.ogs.org.

OldNews USA Wins Top Honors at RootsTech 2017 Innovator Showdown

OldNews USA Wins Top Honors at RootsTech 2017 Innovator Showdown


Old news, it seems, is actually “new” news. Very innovative news in fact. Today at RootsTech, the world’s largest family history technology conference, OldNews USA took top honors in the 2017 Innovator Showdown, walking away with $95,000 in cash and in-kind prizes. OldNews is an android app designed to help users quickly discover their family in historical US newspapers. The app uses the Library of Congress “Chronicling America” collection of more than 11 million newspaper pages from 1789 to 1922 to deliver its results.

In front of a crowd of close to 14,000 live and online viewers, the six RootsTech Innovator Showdown finalists battled for $199,000 in cash and prizes and bragging rights in the rapidly-growing, multi-billion dollar family history industry. An experienced amateur genealogist, Bill Nelson of Auburn, Massachusetts, designed the program as a solution to tedious, difficult online newspaper searches. The OldNews USA app was designed to simplify and streamline the search process.

Using keywords, users can look for newspaper accounts of a person or topic with the option to look at articles of historical events. In a person search, you type names and dates into your mobile device and choose a location on Google Maps which produces a list of newspapers in the targeted geographic area for a time period. It brings up images of the actual newspapers with the name or event you are seeking highlighted so you can quickly locate it on the page. Images can be enlarged for easier access to detail.


Nelson is a software developer by trade. “I was new to android and needed something to practice on. I had felt the pain points of newspaper research and thought ‘this would be a good project,’” he said. Initially he developed the app for his own use, then realizing it could help other researchers, he expanded it into a mobile app.

OldNews is compatible with Android devices, but Nelson is working to create an app for IOS devices and computers. With his winnings, he can now get business and technological assistance to accelerate development. While OldNews USA is designed to search US newspapers, he hopes to adapted the app for other countries.

The 5 finalists were whittled down from more than 40 applicants from the US and Europe. Each took three minutes to convince the panel of five judges and live audience that their product was deserving of a chunk of the $190,000 in cash and prizes.

The major sponsors of the Innovator Showdown this year included Amazon Web Services (AWS), Kickstarter Seed FundSorenson Legacy Foundation, and others.

After each presentation, there was a four-minute question and answer period between each contestant and the judges. The judges then selected the top three winners, and the viewing audience selected the People’s Choice Award winner.

With $190,000 in cash and in-kind prizes and services from sponsors at stake—an increase of nearly $100,000 from the original projection—the pressure, tension, and energy of the event was tremendous.

2017 RootsTech Showdown Winners
  • First Place Judges’ Choice ($90,000 cash, AWS credits, and an investment from Kickstart Seed Fund), Bill Nelson of OldNews USA.
  • Second Place Judges’ Choice ($44,000 cash and AWS credits), The Qroma tag mobile app for embedding stories into pictures, tagging them by voice commands, and making the data accessible on various platforms.
  • Third Place Judges’ Choice Award ($26,000 cash and AWS credits), Louis Kessler, Double Match Triangulator, an app to help sort DNA matches into groups of relatives.
  • People’s Choice ($25,000 cash and AWS credits), Kindex, an app designed to help users create searchable, shareable archives of family letters and other documents using tags to help users easily locate information.
Emberall was the other finalist. It provides a method to capture and store pictures and videos creating an accessible archive.

The judges for the final round included Alan Doan, CEO of Missouri Star Quilt Company, John Richards, Founder and CEO of Startup Ignition, Kenyatta Berry, host of The Genealogy Road Show, Thomas MacEntee, founder of High-Definition Genealogy, and Dalton J. Wright, partner in Kickstart Seed Fund.

The Innovator Showdown, now in its third year, was designed to foster innovation in the family history industry.

Find and share this news release online at the FamilySearch Newsroom

New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday, February 10, 2017


Over 31 million new records are available to search this Findmypast Friday, including;


Discover your Catholic ancestors from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in this first record release from an agreement we've made with the Roman Catholic Church to digitise their unique records for the first time ever. These baptism records list your ancestor's name, their parent's names, and their residence at the time.

Additional information that you may find from the images include place of birth, sponsors, minister who performed the ceremony, and notice of marriage. Catholic priests were charged with noting all vital events of their parishioners. If, for instance, a parishioner married outside her home parish, the priest who performed the marriage would contact her priest to confirm she was baptised and to share the details of her marriage, hence the marriage notice in the baptism register.


View a transcript and image of your ancestor's marriage register from the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. As well as details such as the couple's names, and marriage date and location, you may also find dates and locations of the couples' baptisms.

All our Philadelphia Roman Catholic Parish records are from the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, covering Bucks County, Chester County, Delaware County, Montgomery County, and Philadelphia County. Originally formed as a diocese in 1808 by Pope Pius VII, it was made a metropolitan archdiocese in 1875. The Catholic Church has had a presence in the area since as far back as William Penn's founding of the Province of Pennsylvania in 1681.


In this browse-only search, you can navigate through each of the 199 sacramental registers that make up the Philadelphia Roman Catholic Parish Registers, in their entirety, to discover all there is learn about your ancestor's connections to the church.


Provided by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, these records include images from a variety of sources ranging from the late 1600s to the mid-1900s. Each result has both a transcript and an image of the source document (e.g. original registers, historical society publications, etc.).

This collection is part of a larger body of work that will be published on Findmypast over time. It is important to note that this may not be the only place to find births or baptisms—and there may be records included that are not births or baptisms — in this material from the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, rather these were the records that we were able to identify as largely composed of births and baptisms.


As well as details such as name, date of death and burial, parish and diocese, you may find information on your ancestor's military service, age, birth date, or spouse and children. Some even include tombstone inscriptions.


Pennsylvanian marriage records ranging from the early 1600s to the late 1900s. You can view a transcript and the original image.


Gain an insight into your ancestor and the church they attended. Images can include lists of past ministers and those baptised and confirmed, as well as church histories. The lists of confirmations and communicants may also provide the names of parents and spouses.


These cards were created by the Army so if something happened to a local soldier, the newspaper wouldn't have to scramble for the information. These records are particularly relevant in light of the fire at the National Archives and Records Administration in the 1970s when most World War II personnel files were destroyed.


As well as the typical information you would expect from a census (occupation, address, birth year, etc.), notes detailing the local priest's opinion on your ancestor's faith and dedication to the church let you find out if your ancestor was a good or bad Catholic.


See the record of your ancestor's baptism. The amount of information in each record varies depending on the age of the record, its legibility, and the amount of information recorded by the parish priest at the time of the event. All England Roman Catholic parish records released this week are from the Birmingham and Westminster archdioceses.


View original burial registers to discover more about your ancestor. Every record includes a transcript and an image of the original sacramental register, while some provide additional information such as your ancestor's parents' names or burial plot.


Discover where and when your ancestor was married, along with witnesses' names and the names of the married couple's fathers.


Did your ancestor receive confirmation? Were they a benefactor of a parish? Explore thousands of Roman Catholic congregational records from Birmingham and Westminster to discover your ancestor's relationship with his local parish.


Browse all 747 volumes of the Birmingham and Westminster Archdiocesan Archives from start to finish. The volumes span from 1657 to 1907, listing marriages, baptisms and births, burials, and congregational records including anniversary books, confirmation lists, parish diaries, and more.


Had no joy searching our US marriage records collection for your ancestor? We've just added 26,000,000 new records, so it's definitely worth another look.

MyHeritage Launches Photo Discoveries™


MyHeritage Launches Photo Discoveries™


Exclusive feature delights users with photographs of their ancestors and relatives, added to their family tree in one click

TEL AVIV, Israel & LEHI, Utah, February 10, 2017 MyHeritage, the leading international family history and DNA company, announced today the launch of Photo Discoveries, an innovative feature which transforms family trees by automatically adding matching historical photos. A Photo Discovery provides users with a set of photographs of ancestors and relatives they may have never seen before, originating in family trees contributed by others. Users can add the photographs to the matching profiles in their family tree, in a single click.

Layered on top of MyHeritage's highly accurate Smart Matching™ technology, which locates matching profiles in other family trees, and Instant Discoveries™, which enable users to add entire branches to their family tree in just a few clicks, Photo Discoveries identifies the profiles that have no photographs in the user's family tree and provides photographs of these individuals from matching profiles on other family trees.

Users can add up to ten photographs per Photo Discovery, reject specific ones they do not wish to receive, and apply Photo Discoveries as many times as they would like. The photographs are then copied over to the associated profiles, preserving all useful metadata such as people tags, dates and place names.

“At MyHeritage we’re constantly brainstorming innovative new ways to make our industry-leading matching technologies even better,” said MyHeritage Founder and CEO Gilad Japhet. “Receiving a never-seen-before photograph of an ancestor is a delightful emotional experience, and one that we would like our users to enjoy as often as possible. Photo Discoveries deliver this and fulfill the promise of collaborative genealogy in a slick and gratifying one-click experience."

Viewing Photo Discoveries in thumbnail form is free. Applying Photo Discoveries to one's family tree requires a PremiumPlus or Complete subscription on MyHeritage.

About MyHeritage

MyHeritage is the leading global destination for family history and DNA. As technology thought leaders, MyHeritage has transformed family history into an activity that is accessible and instantly rewarding. Its global user community enjoys access to a massive library of historical records, the most internationally diverse collection of family trees and groundbreaking search and matching technologies. Through MyHeritage DNA, the company offers technologically advanced, affordable DNA tests that reveal users' ethnic origins and previously unknown relatives. Trusted by millions of families, MyHeritage provides an easy way to find new family members, discover ethnic origins, and to share family stories, past and present, and to treasure them for generations to come. MyHeritage is available in 42 languages. www.myheritage.com

MyHeritage Appoints Prominent DNA Expert Dr. Yaniv Erlich as Chief Science Officer

MyHeritage


TEL AVIV, Israel & LEHI, Utah , February 9, 2017MyHeritage, the leading international family history and DNA company, announced today the appointment of Dr. Yaniv Erlich as its Chief Science Officer. Dr. Erlich, a DNA scientist of world renown, will lead scientific development and strategy for MyHeritage DNA, the company's newly established DNA service for family history and ethnicity, and ensure that its products are built on a solid scientific foundation.

Dr. Erlich, nicknamed the Genome Hacker by Nature journal, brings to MyHeritage unparalleled experience in the field of genomics as Assistant Professor of Computer Science and Computational Biology at Columbia University and as a Core Member at the New York Genome Center. He is also the former principal investigator and a Whitehead Fellow at MIT's Whitehead Institute, founder of DNA.LAND and the principal investigator of the Erlich DNA lab.

Dr. Erlich completed his Ph.D. at the Watson School of Biological Sciences at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in 2010, and has won numerous awards as a cutting-edge scientist, including the Burroughs Wellcome Career Award (2013), the Harold M. Weintraub Award (2010) and the IEEE/ACM-CS High Performance Computing Award (2008). Dr. Erlich has a B.Sc. degree cum laude in Neuroscience from Tel Aviv University.

Dr. Erlich's research interests are diverse and cover many facets of computational human genetics, including population studies, DNA privacy, DNA storage and genetic research in crowd-sourced family trees.

“We're delighted to welcome Yaniv to our management team. Yaniv's expertise in computational genetics and its synergy with family history will provide the solid scientific foundation that is fundamental for setting apart our fast-growing DNA service from the others” said MyHeritage Founder and CEO Gilad Japhet. “We are committed to providing our users with the most accurate DNA results, and helping them understand more about themselves. Yaniv will lead a dedicated team of world-class scientists to help us achieve this.”

“I’m excited to join the talented team at MyHeritage and put my scientific experience to use by the millions of users on the MyHeritage platform,” said Dr. Erlich. “I've collaborated with MyHeritage since 2012 and have known them to be forward thinkers about building tools and platforms that enable massive scale scientific studies. I look forward to opening new horizons in consumer genetics in my new role, and further empowering our users with useful and creative tools that harness the latest scientific discoveries”.

MyHeritage DNA was launched in November 2016, offering simple DNA home-testing kits for determining users' ethnic origins and discovering new relatives. The service is offered in more than 190 countries worldwide, in 42 languages.

About MyHeritage

MyHeritage is the leading global destination for family history and DNA. As technology thought leaders, MyHeritage has transformed family history into an activity that is accessible and instantly rewarding. Its global user community enjoys access to a massive library of historical records, the most internationally diverse collection of family trees and groundbreaking search and matching technologies. Through MyHeritage DNA, the company offers technologically advanced, affordable DNA tests that reveal users' ethnic origins and previously unknown relatives. Trusted by millions of families, MyHeritage provides an easy way to find new family members, discover ethnic origins, and to share family stories, past and present, and to treasure them for generations to come. MyHeritage is available in 42 languages. www.myheritage.com

Findmypast launches Catholic Heritage Archive


Findmypast announces plans to create the most comprehensive collection of Roman Catholic sacramental registers for the United States, Britain and Ireland. When complete, this exclusive collection will contain over 100 million records spanning 300 years of Catholic history

  • Millions of exclusive Catholic records published online with more coming soon
  • Findmypast also announces new additions to the ambitious United States Marriages project
  • Release marks significant expansion of Findmypast's US data collection


Thursday 9th February 2017
Time: 8am MT, 10am EST, 3pm GMT

Leading family history website, Findmypast, today announced the creation of the Roman Catholic Heritage Archive, a ground breaking initiative that aims to digitize the historic records of the Catholic Church in the United States, Britain and Ireland.

Findmypast is today releasing over 3 million exclusive records including sacramental registers for the Archdiocese of Philadelphia from 1757 to 1916 as well as for the British Archdioceses of Westminster and Birmingham from 1657 onwards. This builds on last year's publication of more than 10 million Irish Catholic parish registers.

The Catholic Church holds some of the oldest and best preserved genealogical records ever created. However, as many of these documents memorialize important religious sacraments such as baptism, marriage and burial, their privacy has long been protected and access to original copies has traditionally been hard to come by.

In collaboration with various Archdioceses of the Catholic Church, Findmypast is helping to bring these records online in one unified collection for the first time ever. Exclusively available on Findmypast, images of original documents will be completely free to view in many cases. Fully searchable transcripts will also be included, providing family historians from the around the world with easy access to these once closely guarded records.

The next phase of the Catholic Heritage Archive will include records from the archdioceses of New York and Baltimore as well as additional records from Philadelphia. There are over 30 million records in just these three dioceses. The digitization of the whole archive is a monumental undertaking and, when complete, will contain hundreds of millions of records for the USA alone.

Brian Donovan, Licensing Manager at Findmypast said; “The Roman Catholic Church is the largest Christian denomination in the world. Despite the popular perception that it had few adherents in Britain, or was not that important in American settlement, it has always been a significant component (up to 25%) of the population. The Catholic Heritage Archive will uncover the history of millions of Irish, Italian, German, Polish and many other nationalities as they made a new home in the USA.

Kate Feighery, archivist at the Archdiocese of New York said; “The Archdiocese of New York is delighted to begin the process of opening their sacramental records for historical research. As one of the major immigration hubs in the country, and the second largest diocese in the United States, many Catholic Americans can trace their ancestors back to New York. The Catholic Heritage Archive will allow interested amateur and professional historians to more easily find out more about their family’s roots in Catholic New York.

Cait Kokolus, Director of the Philadelphia Archdiocesan Historical Records Center said; “ The digitization of parish records is a great gift to the Catholics in the Archdiocese. Now they will be able to find where their grandmother was baptized, or when their great-grandparents married. In such a quickly changing society, many people are discovering that knowing their family history gives a sense of identity and stability.


10 million new US marriage Records

Findmypast has also just released a further 10 million United States Marriage records in association with Family Search International. The new additions cover 45 states, over 1,800 counties and date from the early 17th century up to the present day. Over 65 million records are currently available to search within the collection.

Covering 360 years of marriages from 1650-2010, when complete this landmark collection will form the single largest online archive of U.S. marriages in history and will only be found in its entirety exclusively on Findmypast.

The launch of these new US records is central to Findmypast's growth strategy in the U.S. They will complement Findmypast’s massive collection of British and Irish data, providing many more connections and a more comprehensive experience to family historians in the US and all over the world.

For more information, visit: http://www.findmypast.com/catholicrecords

For those interested in the history of Catholicism in the United States, an interactive timeline hosted by Findmypast’s partners, Twile, can be viewed here: https://twile.com/timeline/catholicismintheus

Ancestry Appoints Eric Heath as Chief Privacy Officer

Silicon Valley privacy expert moves to Ancestry to lead the company's privacy initiatives

LEHI, Utah and SAN FRANCISCO, Feb. 08, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Ancestry, the global leader in family history and consumer genomics, today announced that Eric Heath has been appointed Chief Privacy Officer, reporting to Carla Newell, Chief Legal and Risk Officer at Ancestry. Heath brings extensive legal, privacy, and compliance leadership experience from globally recognized technology companies to Ancestry.

Heath has spent over a decade working for both consumer and B2B internet companies, including Zenefits, Yahoo, and LinkedIn building relationships with regulatory bodies and policy makers and shaping company policies, procedures and operational compliance programs to enable business growth. Heath will work closely with teams across the company guiding compliance and privacy program development to support the rapidly growing business and meet regulatory requirements in markets across the globe.

"From the very beginning, ensuring the security and privacy of our customers' information has been one of Ancestry's highest priorities," said Tim Sullivan, Chief Executive Officer of Ancestry. "Ancestry has built on customer trust for decades, and this trust has enabled transformative moments for millions of people who now understand more deeply who they are and where they came from. Eric's appointment reaffirms our longstanding commitment to nurturing that trust. His experience will be a huge asset as we continue to invest significantly in best-in-class protections and policies for the powerful information that millions have entrusted to us."

"With the Ancestry database of DNA from more than three million people, making it the leader in the consumer genomics space, along with Ancestry's deep family history data, I am excited to be joining the company as it continues its groundbreaking work," said Heath. "As Tim has said, Ancestry fundamentally views privacy and security with equal status to the business -- reinforcing the value to our users and enabling our success as a company. As the company grows globally, and privacy laws and regulations evolve, I look forward to helping Ancestry build and maintain consumer trust while helping people explore more about themselves, their families and connections to history and the world through Ancestry's products."

Prior to joining Ancestry, Heath was Chief Privacy Officer at Zenefits, led the Privacy Policy and Data Governance team at Yahoo, and served as LinkedIn's Global Privacy lead. He is an expert in tackling privacy issues on a global scale helping businesses navigate the intersection of privacy, data protection and security. Heath received his bachelor's degree from Notre Dame and his J.D. from Washburn University School of Law.

About Ancestry

Ancestry, the global leader in family history and consumer genomics, harnesses the information found in family trees, historical records, and DNA to help people gain a new level of understanding about their lives. Ancestry has more than 2.4 million paying subscribers across its core Ancestry websites and DNA data from more than 3 million people. Since 1996, more than 19 billion records have been added to Ancestry's databases, and users have created more than 80 million family trees on the Ancestry flagship site and its affiliated international websites. Ancestry offers a suite of family history products and services including AncestryDNA, Archives, AncestryProGenealogists, Newspapers.com and Fold3. AncestryDNA is owned and operated by Ancestry.com DNA, LLC, a subsidiary of Ancestry.com, LLC.

Ancestry Publishes New Genetic Research on U.S. Population Structures in Nature Communications

Ancestry Publishes New Genetic Research on U.S. Population Structures in Nature Communications

DNA and genealogical information from more than 700,000 AncestryDNA users gives new insight into historical events in North America during the last several hundred years

LEHI, Utah and SAN FRANCISCO, Feb. 07, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Today, Ancestry published a scientific article entitled "Clustering of 770 thousand genomes reveals post-colonial population structure of North America" in Nature Communications. The article shares new research using genetic data from over 700,000 individuals from North America to uncover a detailed picture of the subtle patterns of migration and settlement in post-colonial USA. Ancestry is the leader in family history and consumer genomics with 80 million family trees and more than three million people using AncestryDNA, a combination which powered the fine-grain historical insights that have previously been inaccessible from genetic studies.

This research was led by Ancestry's Chief Scientific Officer Catherine Ball, Ph.D., her Ancestry colleagues and historian Erin Battat, Ph.D., from Harvard University.

"Ancestry is just scratching the surface of scientific discoveries that can be made when combining large amounts of genomic data with detailed pedigree information, and I'm incredibly proud of the work the team put into this research project as well as the fascinating results we've found," said Ball. "It's especially rewarding to gain insights that not only contribute significantly to genomic research, but provide a glimpse into our own personal histories and identities."

Key highlights of the paper:


  • The authors created a network of genetically-identified relationships among over 700,000 individuals, and identified clusters of individuals who were very subtly more related to one another. By using family tree information, the team identified that these clusters corresponded to detailed and subtle patterns of migration and settlement in post-colonial USA.
  • The main achievement of this research is not only the development of novel scientific methodology, but also Ancestry's use of an extremely large sample of both genetic and pedigree data.
  • This research identifies population structure in North America, shaped by many different geographical and cultural factors, which has previously been difficult to determine at such a fine granularity from genetic data alone.
  • The data depict movements and settlements across east-west and north-south gradients, and pick out groups descended from those who remained isolated after moving to the USA for geographical or cultural reasons, such as Amish populations within in Midwestern states and Pennsylvania.
  • The authors suggest that these data reveal more than our history. Some clusters of individuals have higher frequencies of gene variants associated with disease risk, which could inform future avenues of research in the field.

Ancestry is well on the way to harnessing the scientific power of its two unique data sets -- the combination of the records of history in our genetics, coupled with paper records of family history. Such research can not only provide personal stories, but also the context of ties between people, places, and human events, allowing people to understand their identities even more deeply. The Ancestry team continues to study ethnic diversity, migration patterns, human evolution, and the history of our species to uncover connections among mankind.

This work was made possible by the contributions thousands of customers who have researched family trees, taken the AncestryDNA test and agreed to participate in scientific research. The science and research revealed in the article will be made available in a product feature in the coming months.

About Ancestry

Ancestry, the global leader in family history and consumer genomics, harnesses the information found in family trees, historical records, and DNA to help people gain a new level of understanding about their lives. Ancestry has more than 2.4 million paying subscribers across its core Ancestry websites and DNA data from more than 3 million people. Since 1996, more than 19 billion records have been added to Ancestry's databases, and users have created more than 80 million family trees on the Ancestry flagship site and its affiliated international websites. Ancestry offers a suite of family history products and services including AncestryDNA, Archives, AncestryProGenealogists, Newspapers.com and Fold3. AncestryDNA is owned and operated by Ancestry.com DNA, LLC, a subsidiary of Ancestry.com, LLC.

TheGenealogist Launches over 282,000 Parish Records, plus 43,000 New War Memorial Records


TheGenealogist Launches over 282,000 Parish Records, plus 43,000 New War Memorial Records

The Genealogist has added to the millions of its UK Parish Records collection with over 282,000 new records from Essex, Cumberland and Norfolk making it easier to find your ancestors’ baptisms, marriages and burials in these fully searchable records covering ancient parishes. Some of the records go back as far as 1672.

The new release of War Memorial records means there are now over 350,000 searchable records. This latest release includes war memorials from London, along with further English counties including Cumbria, Berkshire, Warwickshire and Suffolk. The collection also stretches across the globe to encompass new War Memorials situated in Perth, Australia and the Province of Saskatchewan in Canada. Fully searchable by name, researchers can read transcriptions and see images of the dedications that commemorate soldiers who have fallen in the Boer War, WW1 and various other conflicts.

In amongst these newly published War Memorial records are those from St John’s Church in Bassenthwaite, Cumbria. This is a fascinating WW1 roll with men who died or served and includes information such as that for Louis Willis Bell who died in Rouen as a result of poison gassing. Another notable entry is that for Isaac Hall. This soldier enlisted in January 1915 in 7th Border Regiment and was discharged on the 21st March 1917, because of wounds resulting in the loss of his left leg.

Example:
Parish Records can sometimes unearth fascinating stories

We are all aware that parish records give us those all important dates and names for our ancestors - but in some cases they reveal interesting stories as well. When a vicar, or parish clerk, feels the person they are entering in the register needs an extra explanation, over and above the date and name of the person, then some fascinating historical details can emerge for researchers to read.

As an excellent example of this we can look in the parish records for All Saints Church, in Maldon, Essex. Here we find the burial of one Edward Bright in the year 1750. Edward, a Tallow Chandler and Grocer, who died when he was in his late twenties, also had an unusual claim to fame.

The entry in the parish register, on TheGenealogist, reveals that he was an extremely large man, weighing in at 42 stone (588 pounds) and was in fact believed to be the fattest man in England at the time.

Edward Bright by David Ogborne (http://www.itsaboutmaldon.co.uk/edwardbright/) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

The notes for his burial, on the 12 November 1750, in the parish register, explain that Edward had to be buried in a special coffin as he was so large. To remove the casket from his room, above his shop, special provisions were needed requiring structural modifications to the wall and stairs to aid his final journey to All Saints.

Having arrived at church on a carriage, more unusual procedures were used to get the deceased to his final resting place. Edward’s coffin would have been far too heavy to be borne by pallbearers up the aisle to rest before the congregation during the funeral service. Also it would have severely taxed the muscles of those men who would have normally lowered it manually into the grave. The logistics, in this case, needed rollers to be used to slide the coffin up to a brickwork vault and then a triangle and pulleys were used to lower poor Edward into his grave.

The parish register entry did, however, not just dwell on the problems of burying a man of such large proportions. It went on to also recorded a number of positive attributes that Edward Bright had - so giving us a picture of the man that he was. We can see that he was well thought of by the vicar and community of this 18th century Essex parish. The register tells us that he was: “... A Very Honest Tradesman. A Facetious Companion, Comely In His Person, Affable In His Temper, A Kind Husband, A Tender Father & Valuable Friend.”

As we have seen here, sometimes a parish register can give you so much more than just the date that your ancestor was baptised, married or buried.

Twile is now completely free for everybody



Doncaster: 7th February 2017

Family history timeline Twile announces its service is now free for all users.

The UK based company, who will be exhibiting at RootsTech in Salt Lake City this week, have revised their subscription in order to fully embrace their mission of making family history more engaging for the whole family.

The totally free service now allows all Twile users to:

  • Build their family tree
  • Share and collaborate with family
  • Add unlimited milestones and photos
  • Import trees and memories from FamilySearch
  • Import and merge multiple GEDCOM files

Paul Brooks, CEO comments “When we started Twile, our vision was for all family members to share and collaborate on their family story. We want family historians to share their research with their family and we want the whole family to get involved - we felt that the paid subscription was getting in the way.”

Twile, winners of last year’s People’s Choice award at RootsTech, have received financial backing from Findmypast and other investors. Paul adds “Although we will no longer be charging customers to use our core product, clearly we still need to make money. We have some ideas for optional add-ons that customers could purchase to enhance their Twile experience, but we don’t plan to charge a subscription fee or to limit usage again.”

Privacy is a key part of Twile’s offering and the company wants to assure customers that their personal data is secure and will never be sold. Paul adds “We are aware of concerns within the industry about the privacy of data, but we will never sell our customer data or jeopardise their privacy in any way.”

About Twile

Twile is a UK-based interactive timeline of everything that’s ever happened in your family. The timeline consists of photos and milestones—such as births, marriages, and deaths—that tell the story of your family from your earliest known ancestor right through to today. Family historians can import their family tree from any online genealogy service and then add more recent events from their own life before inviting family members to explore and contribute.

While the Twile website is aimed primarily at family historians, it is also designed to encourage the rest of the family to add their own content, including the younger generations. Twile was the winner of two innovation awards at RootsTech 2016, including People’s Choice.

BCG Free Webinar - “Weaving DNA Test Results into a Proof Argument” by Karen Stanbary, CG

BCG OFFERS FREE WEBINAR Tuesday, 21 February, 8:00 p.m. Eastern

“Weaving DNA Test Results into a Proof Argument” by Karen Stanbary, CG

This lecture will illustrate how to integrate each element of the Genealogical Proof Standard in a proof argument that relies heavily on autosomal DNA test results to answer a relationship research question. The examples are drawn from "Rafael Arriaga, A Mexican Father in Michigan: Autosomal DNA Helps Identify Paternity” from the National Genealogical Society Quarterly (June 2016).

The Board for Certification of Genealogists (BCG) will present “Weaving DNA Test Results into a Proof Argument” by Karen Stanbary, CG, free to the public at 8:00 p.m. EDT, 21 February 2017.

Karen Stanbary, CG, holds a Master’s Degree in Clinical Social Work from the University of Chicago. She specializes in Midwestern, Chicago, and Mexican research as well as complex problem-solving and DNA analysis. A regular instructor in Chicago’s Newberry Library Adult Education program, Karen lectures on topics including Genetic Genealogy, Advanced Genetic Genealogy and the Genealogical Proof Standard. She is a faculty member at GRIP, IGHR, and SLIG. She published a complex evidence case study incorporating traditional documentary research and autosomal DNA analysis in the June 2016 issue of the National Genealogical Society Quarterly. She holds the Certified Genealogist credential from the Board for Certification of Genealogists where she serves on the Genetic Genealogy Standards committee.

President Jeanne Larzalere Bloom, CG, says, “The Board for Certification of Genealogists is proud to offer this new webinar as part of an ongoing series that supports our mission to provide education for family historians. This webinar will address genealogy standards for research. By promoting a uniform standard of competence and ethics BCG endeavors to foster public confidence in genealogy.”

Register for “Weaving DNA Test Results into a Proof Argument” by Karen Stanbary, CG, before 21 February 2017 at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1253173154332404739.

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. For more information contact: office@BCGcertification.org.

View BCG’s past Legacy webinars at http://familytreewebinars.com/bcg and http://bcgcertification.org/blog/bcg-webinars. For more information on educational opportunities, please visit: http://www.BCGcertification.org/certification/educ.html.

The words Certified Genealogist are a registered certification mark, and the designations CG, CGL and Certified Genealogical Lecturer are service marks of the Board for Certification of Genealogists®, used under license by board certificants after periodic evaluation.

New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday, February 3, 2017


Over 1.1 million new records are available to search this Findmypast Friday, including;


Over 1 million new records have been added to our collection of Australian Electoral Rolls. The new additions cover Queensland and Tasmania and will allow you to discover where your ancestor lived and whether they were eligible to vote.

We have also made vast improvements to our Australian Electoral Rolls search. Previously the Rolls existed as simple PDF searches that could only be accessed separately, state by state. We have now fully transcribed these collections and placed them into one central collection. This makes searching for your Australian ancestors easier than ever before as you can now search across all 12.6 million of these valuable census substitutes at once. The entire collection covers New South Wales, Queensland, South Australia, Tasmania, the Northern Territory and Western Australia and spans the years 1860 to 1959.


Early emigration from Britain contains over 21,000 records that will allow you to find out if your ancestors left Britain for North America or the West Indies between 1636-1815. The collection includes 10 pieces from The National Archives including colonial papers, general entry books, passenger registers and weekly immigration returns.

Each record includes both an image and a transcript of the original source material. Transcripts will reveal your ancestor’s, occupation, year of birth, the year they departed, their destination and the ship they sailed on. Depending on the type of document, images of the original records may include additional details such as marital status, former residence, and nationality of settler.


In this browse-only search, you can navigate through each of the 12 National Archives pieces in their entirety to learn more about your early immigrant ancestors or the history of British emigration.


Find out if your British ancestors left for a settlement in Barbados between 1678 and 1715 with over 20,000 assorted documents including baptisms, burials, censuses, landowner lists, and other more.
Each result provides you with a transcript and image of the original record. Transcripts will reveal your ancestor’s birth year, age and parish as well as the nature of the event that was being recorded and the date. Depending on the type of document, images of the original records may include additional details such as fathers’ names or information pertaining to other North American colonies such as the colonies of Rhode Island and Connecticut.


Browse 2 volumes of fascinating colonial records including lists of property owners & militia members and a 1715 census of the island’s European inhabitants.


Explore over 55,000 records to uncover the details of those on board the Royal African Company’s ships to and from Africa as well as the names of those who lived and died at the numerous company forts. The records come from The National Archives T 70 series, Company of Royal Adventurers of England Trading with Africa and successors.

The Royal African Company was a mercantile company from 1660 until it was dissolved in 1750. It was first incorporated as the Company of Royal Adventurers Trading to Africa before being reconstituted in 1672 as the Royal African Company of England. The Company held a monopoly over trade in West Africa and, until the 1730s, played a key role in the dark history of transatlantic slave trade. The company set up its headquarters at Cape Coast Castle on the Gold Coast (modern-day Ghana) and brought traders, merchants, miners, carpenters, native interpreters, and even distillers to build their forts and trading posts. You will also find the names of thousands of British soldiers who travelled with the company. From Africa, the company brought men, women, and children as slaves to the colonies, as well as gold, wax, and ivory. After the Royal African Company lost its monopoly on the slave trade, it focused its attention on the ivory and gold markets.


Browse 27 volumes of Royal African Company records to learn about the crucial role the company played in the abominable history of the transatlantic slave trade. The system enslaved millions of African men, women, and children over several centuries before finally being abolished in Britain in 1807 after years of campaigning.

Twile Launches Free Family Infographic

Twile Selected to Be Part of Pitch@Palace Boot Camp

Twile Launches Free Family Infographic

Doncaster: 2nd February 2017 Family history timeline Twile have today released a new infographic feature, designed to help family historians share their research and engage younger generations.

Twile Launches Free Family Infographic

With over 60% of family historians concerned that their findings will be lost or forgotten and 74% doubtful if anyone will continue their family history research*, Twile have come up a quick and interesting way of getting non-genealogists interested in their ancestry.

Twile’s new personalised family infographic is free and available to everyone – whether currently using Twile or not – at http://www.twile.com/numbers. Users simply import their FamilySearch tree or upload a GEDCOM and their infographic is automatically created.

Users will be able to see statistics such as the average number of children per family, the most common surnames, the ratio of men to women and the average age of marriage.

The infographic can then be shared easily with other members of the family. Because 80% of family historians use social media, such as Facebook and Twitter, to communicate with friends and family, Twile have designed the infographic to be shared online, as well as downloaded and printed.

Twile CEO Paul Brooks comments “We’re constantly trying to find ways to help our customers get their wider family interested and engaged in their family history research. Our timeline goes a long way towards helping with that, but the new infographic injects some more fun into it.”

Twile will have a competition running throughout February to win a $200 Amazon gift card. Customers can create their infographic at www.twile.com/numbers, share it and tag Twile on Facebook (@TwileTimeline) or Twitter (@TwileTweets) to enter the prize draw.

About Twile

Twile is a UK-based interactive timeline of everything that’s ever happened in your family. The timeline consists of photos and milestones—such as births, marriages, and deaths—that tell the story of your family from your earliest known ancestor right through to today. Family historians can import their family tree from any online genealogy service and then add more recent events from their own life before inviting family members to explore and contribute.

While the Twile website is aimed primarily at family historians, it is also designed to encourage the rest of the family to add their own content, including the younger generations. Twile was the winner of two innovation awards at RootsTech 2016, including People’s Choice.

*Twile conducted research with Findmypast customers in August 2016

The New York Genealogical and Biographical Society Announces NYG&B Labs


NYG&B Labs will create an innovative space which leverages the latest trends in technology and digital services to assist in telling the stories of New York’s families.

NEW YORK, NY -- The New York Genealogical and Biographical Society (NYG&B) announces the creation of NYG&B Labs, an innovative space which leverages the latest trends in technology and digital services to assist in telling the stories of New York’s families.

NYG&B Labs will be a destination for aspiring digital professionals who seek to advance their expertise in technology and its applications for the fields of history and genealogy. Each quarter team members will work on a designated, pre-approved project. Once completed, projects may be added to resources at newyorkfamilyhistory.org and beyond.

Members of the NYG&B Labs team will benefit from one-on-one interaction with experts in the fields of genealogy and technology as they work to creatively apply technology to traditional genealogical methods relating to New York’s history. Team members will also receive a quarterly stipend and can work from anywhere in the world.

“NYG&B Labs will provide benefits to anyone researching the stories of New York’s past,” noted NYG&B President D. Joshua Taylor; “with NYG&B labs, the opportunities to create new tools and resources are nearly endless.” The launch of the project was made possible with funding from the NYG&B, individual donors, and support from commercial and nonprofit entities within the genealogical community.

Applications for NYG&B Labs Team members are now being accepted at http://www.newyorkfamilyhistory.org/labs. The NYG&B is specifically seeking team members with an interest in technology, geo-coding, mapping, social media, website development, digital services, history, and other topics.

About the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society (NYG&B)

The NYG&B has been helping people find their New York family and tell their stories since 1869. The largest genealogical society in New York, the NYG&B delivers essential online resources for researching New York State at www.newyorkfamilyhistory.org, including digital collections, articles, research aids, webinars, and other tools. The NYG&B has thousands of members across the globe, and each quarter publishes the NYG&B Record, a scholarly journal devoted to New York genealogy and biography, as well as the New York Researcher, a magazine which features instructional articles and the latest news on emerging resources and technologies. A longtime publisher of authoritative scholarship on New York subjects, the NYG&B’s recent books include the award-winning New York Family History Research Guide and Gazetteer, offering more than 800 pages of detailed resources related to New York, and the New York City Municipal Archives: An Authorized Guide for Family Historians. The NYG&B provides education programs, both live and online, to New York researchers from the beginner to the professional and produces the biannual New York State Family History Conference. Each day the NYG&B engages with the dynamic, fast-growing, rapidly changing field of family history through accurate, thorough research and the highest standards of scholarship.