Showing posts with label British genealogy. Show all posts
Showing posts with label British genealogy. Show all posts

Thursday, August 7, 2014

The British Newspaper Archive starts digitising eight new titles


More than 8 million newspaper pages from 1710-1954 are now available to search at The British Newspaper Archive (www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk).

In the last month, the website has started digitising the newspaper archives of eight new titles. These cover England, Scotland and Northern Ireland and include the London Evening Standard, Glasgow’s Daily Record and the Northern Whig.

The first years from the following new titles have been added to The British Newspaper Archive:

  • Biggleswade Chronicle, covering 1912
  • Daily Record, covering 1914-1915
  • Lake's Falmouth Packet and Cornwall Advertiser, covering 1864
  • London Evening Standard, covering 1860-1862 and 1866-1867
  • Newcastle Evening Chronicle, covering 1915
  • Northern Whig, covering 1869-1870
  • Surrey Comet, covering 1854-1857 and 1859-1870
  • Watford Observer, covering 1864-1865, 1867, 1869-1870

You’ll find more information and links to these new additions at http://blog.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/2014/08/07/8-new-titles-including-the-london-evening-standard/

About the British Newspaper Archive

The British Newspaper Archive is a partnership project between the British Library and DC Thomson Family History (formally known as brightsolid online publishing). From November 2011 to 2021, up to 40 million pages from historical newspapers across the UK and Ireland will be uploaded to the website www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk

The British Library is the national library of the United Kingdom. It provides world class information services to the academic, business, research and scientific communities and offers unparalleled access to the world’s largest and most comprehensive research collection.

Monday, June 30, 2014

Registration is now open for the 2014 British Institute!


The International Society for British Genealogy and Family History announces the courses for the 14th annual British Institute, to be held 20-24 October in Salt Lake City at the Salt Lake Plaza Hotel, located next door to the LDS Family History Library.

“David Rencher's Irish Land Records course was one of the very best courses I have ever attended. The material was more advanced than available anywhere else, and I find myself referring to the syllabus notebook regularly. Having the class at the Family History Library, where we could immediately apply what we learned in the afternoons, was especially helpful. I made many new discoveries about my Irish ancestors that week. David is an excellent instructor! I highly recommend anyone researching Irish ancestors to take his courses.” – Catherine Desmarais, CG, 2013 attendee.

“The best kept secret is out for continuing education institutes!” said ISBGFH President Ann Lisa Pearson. “The British Institute is the place to be, providing students with a unique learning experience while working with their own research. Instructors will be available each afternoon to consult with students throughout the week-long Institute program, applying classroom education and the opportunity to do more in-depth, on-site research in the records at the Family History Library.”


Your opportunity to study with genealogy professionals:

  • Award-winning genealogist: Thomas W. Jones, PhD, CG, CGL, FASG, FUGA, FNGS
  • Irish research expert: David E. Rencher, AG, CG, FIGRS, FUGA
  • Well-known educator Paul Milner on fundamental research in Scottish records
  • Strategies and skills for Welsh research with Darris Williams, AG
  • Personal research consultations
  • Access and instruction with British collections at the Family History Library
  • Morning educational program followed by afternoon research sessions in the library

The 2014 British Institute offers four tracks taught by expert genealogists:

From Simple to Complex: Applying Genealogy’s Standard of Acceptability to British Research – Thomas W. Jones, Ph.D., CG, CGL, FASG, FUGA, FNGS
Through hands-on activities, lectures, and discussions, participants will learn how to use widely accepted standards to measure their genealogical work’s accuracy and to assess others’ genealogical conclusions. In the process they also will learn about genealogical research planning, its implementation, genealogical reasoning, and the preparation of credible genealogical products.

Researching Your Irish Ancestors – David Rencher, AG, CG, FIGRS, FUGA
This course is designed to help the student of Irish genealogical research, whether beginning or advanced. Strategies for establishing a sound beginning and building on that foundation using proven research techniques will be coupled with an understanding of what records sources are available online, on microfilm and in Ireland. Individual consultations are provided with the course coordinator to assist each participant with ways to extend their research.

Scottish Research: The Fundamentals and Beyond – Paul Milner
Scottish laws, regulations and records are different from the rest of the British Isles, yet with enough similarities to create confusion for the unwary. This course will address the fundamentals of all the major record groups, examining how to search the indexes, exploring what is and is not available online. Case studies will highlight the research and record evaluation processes to determine next steps. Individual consultations are available to assist each participant with their personal research.

Welsh Family History Made Simple – Darris Williams, AG
Welsh family history is different from other localities in some significant ways. Those differences are not impossible roadblocks. Understanding the peculiarities is a good first step to success. Record knowledge is important but not the key. Understanding how to search, evaluate evidence and collate information will resolve many difficult research situations. This course will provide examples of problems, aw well as strategies and skills for learning more about your ancestors.

Registration Information
Online registration and hotel booking information is available at the ISBGFH’s website: http://www.isbgfh.org

If preferred, a mail-in registration form is provided. If you have any questions, please e-mail institute_director@isbgfh.org

Thursday, June 19, 2014

The British Newspaper Archive: 240,000 extra newspaper pages now online


Thousands of historical newspaper pages are added to The British Newspaper Archive (www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk) every week, so the coverage keeps getting better and better.

In the last month, 240,000 extra pages from 1790-1954 were made searchable. 56 English and Scottish newspaper titles were updated, including the Aberdeen Journal, the Kent & Sussex Courier and the Morpeth Herald.

The additions also included three brand new titles:
  • Dundee, Perth and Forfar People’s Journal, covering 1858-1861
  • Folkestone, Hythe, Sandgate & Cheriton Herald, covering 1913, 1915 and 1924
  • Penny Illustrated Paper, covering 1862-1870
You’ll find more information and a full list of recent additions at http://blog.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/2014/06/09/240000-extra-newspaper-pages-now-online/

About the British Newspaper Archive

The British Newspaper Archive is a partnership project between the British Library and DC Thomson Family History (formally known as brightsolid online publishing). From November 2011 to 2021, up to 40 million pages from historical newspapers across the UK and Ireland will be uploaded to the website www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk

The British Library is the national library of the United Kingdom. It provides world class information services to the academic, business, research and scientific communities and offers unparalleled access to the world’s largest and most comprehensive research collection.

Tuesday, April 8, 2014

Here & Then: The British Newspaper Archive’s brand new mobile app

You can now view fascinating historic articles, images and adverts from The British Newspaper Archive through your iPhone for free.


Download Here & Then from Apple’s iTunes store - https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/here-then-from-british-newspaper/id836503496?ls=1&mt=8

Free daily stories from historic newspapers

Download our mobile app today and read stories from over 200 years of historical newspapers for free, wherever you are.

  • Learn what happened on this day in history
  • Discover reports reflecting today’s news
  • Enjoy interesting and amusing snippets dating back to the 1700s

Don’t have an iPhone?

You can also read daily stories on our Facebook page – make sure you like The British Newspaper Archive on Facebook – http://www.facebook.com/TheBritishNewspaperArchive.


About The British Newspaper Archive

1. The British Newspaper Archive is a partnership project between the British Library and DC Thomson Family History. From November 2011 to 2021, up to 40 million pages from historical newspapers across the UK and Ireland (spanning the period, 1700 to 1950) will be uploaded to the website. www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk.

2. The British Library is the national library of the United Kingdom. It provides world class information services to the academic, business, research and scientific communities and offers unparalleled access to the world's largest and most comprehensive research collection.

3. D.C Thomson Family History began life in 1995 as Scotland Online and is a leading UK independent provider of IT business services to large public and private sector organisations. The online publishing division of D.C. Thomson has significant expertise in the digitisation and management of archival records, and works in partnership with the British Library, the National Archives and the National Records of Scotland Headquartered in Dundee, the company is owned by the publishers D.C. Thomson and has offices in Edinburgh and London.

Friday, March 28, 2014

findmypast Announces 1939 Register - 40 Million British War Time Records Online



  • Most anticipated family history project since the 1911 census
  • Only complete overview of the population between 1922 and 1950 will open up the past


British-owned online family history world leader DC Thomson Family History (who own findmypast) and The National Archives have today announced a joint project to make records of 40 million civilians held in the 1939 register available online. Once digitised, it is estimated that the collection will comprise almost 1.2 million scanned full-colour images of documents covering the entire civilian population of England & Wales at the outbreak of WWII.

The 1939 register was taken on 29 September 1939 by the British Government and recorded personal details of individuals in order to issue identity cards and ration books. It later formed the basis of the National Health Service’s records. When complete, the 1939 register will be fully searchable online for the first time, opening up the past to a new generation of family and social historians, just as the 1911 census did on its release in 2009.

The records contain the address, full name, date of birth, sex, marital status and occupation of individuals, as well as changes of name. Although the Register is literally within living memory for many people, information about living individuals will be kept closed for 100 years from their year of birth, or until proof of death has been authenticated.

From today, anybody interested in being kept informed about the project can register at www.1939register.co.uk.

Annelies Van Den Belt, CEO of DC Thomson Family History said: “This announcement is great news not just for British family historians and those with British relatives, but for anyone with an interest in history itself; providing a fascinating snapshot of the country as it stood on the edge of the most widespread conflict in human history.

“This significant project will bring these records to a global audience for the first time, and combined with the 1.8 billion records already available on our websites will make it easier than ever to begin your family history journey and uncover the powerful stories that lie within and that make us who we are.”

Mary Gledhill, Commercial Director, at The National Archives, added: “The National Archives is delighted to be working with DC Thomson Family History to open up this unique record collection to the world, allowing history enthusiasts to discover more about the people at the outbreak of the Second World War. In the absence of a 1931 and 1941 census, this collection is all the more valuable to family historians trying to trace their ancestors.”

The 1939 register project is the latest contract to be awarded to DC Thomson Family History by The National Archives. Record sets previously digitised by the company in association with The National Archives include Crime, Prisons and Punishment; outbound passenger lists; British Army Service records; Merchant Navy Seamen’s records; Maritime Birth, Marriage and Death indexes and the 1911 census.

Tuesday, September 24, 2013

British Institute 2013 - Don’t Miss Your Opportunity to Study With The Experts!


If you’re a last-minute Lilly (or Louie), there is still time to register for the few remaining open spots to attend the British Institute in Salt Lake City, 7-11 October 2013.

The International Society for British Genealogy and Family History will accept registrations until Monday, 30 September, for a week of lectures and mentoring by well-known British genealogists Graham Walter, Maggie Loughran and Paul Blake.

The registration fee is $495, and covers five days of instruction with morning lectures and afternoon research opportunities in the Family History Library, including one-on-one mentoring with your instructor.

All courses will be in the Radisson Hotel Downtown, a short walk to the Family History Library. Hotel rooms are still available at the Crystal Inn at $79.00 per night, including breakfast and shuttle bus service to and from the airport, and to the Radisson each day.

Full details and registration at http://www.isbgfh.org.

Thursday, April 4, 2013

2013 British Institute Details Announced


The International Society for British Genealogy and Family History Announces Courses and Instructors for 2013 British Institute

WESTMINSTER, Colo., 3 April 2013—The International Society for British Genealogy and Family History announces the courses for the 13th annual British Institute, to be held 7–11 October in Salt Lake City at the Radisson Downtown, located two blocks from the Family History Library. Registration will open 9:00 a.m. Pacific daylight time on 8 April 2013 and class size is limited.

“The best kept secret is out for continuing education institutes!” said ISBGFH President Ann Lisa Pearson. “The British Institute is the place to be, providing students with a unique learning experience while working with their own research. Instructors will be available each afternoon to consult with students throughout the time of the Institute, applying classroom education and the opportunity to do more in-depth, on-site research in the records at the Family History Library.”

“The opportunity to be taught by the best teachers in the presence of the largest genealogy library was a dream come true!” said Paul Hawthorne, 2012 attendee.

Featuring top-notch educators and British resources

  • Award-winning genealogist: Thomas W. Jones, PhD, CG, CGL, FASG, FUGA, FNGS
  • Irish research expert: David E. Rencher, AG, CG, FIGRS, FUGA
  • From England: Maggie Loughran, Paul Blake, and Graham Walter
  • Personal research consultations
  • Access and instruction with British collections at the Family History Library
  • Morning educational program followed by afternoon research sessions in the library

The 2013 British Institute offers four tracks taught by expert genealogists:

From Simple to Complex: Applying Genealogy’s Standard of Acceptability to British Research – Thomas W. Jones, Ph.D., CG, CGL, FASG, FUGA, FNGS Through hands-on activities, lectures, and discussions, participants will learn how to use widely accepted standards to measure their genealogical work’s accuracy and to assess others’ genealogical conclusions. In the process they also will learn about genealogical research planning, its implementation, genealogical reasoning, and the preparation of credible genealogical products.

Irish Land Records and Fragmentary Evidence Correlation
David E. Rencher, AG, CG, FIGRS, FUGA This course is designed to address Irish genealogical research for both the landed and landless families in Ireland. When land records are meager, there are still methods to research the landless in the land records and the associated record fragments created from land use. Assembling this meager evidence provides the clearest picture possible for an Irish family in the 17th to 20th centuries.

Sources for Tracing Pre-mid-nineteenth Century English Ancestors
Maggie Loughran and Paul Blake
Concentrating on tracing pre-1850 English ancestors, this course will interest those whose ancestors emigrated to North America before English civil registration in 1837, or those who have traced their ancestors back to the early 1800s. For each record category, examples of original documents will be used to guide you through interpretation, locating, and lastly, how to access through the Internet, the Family History Library, and other available resources.

Using the Cloud for British Family History Research – Graham Walter, MBCS
This course will provide an introduction to “The Cloud” and how to use it to one’s research advantage. Learn how to choose the right combination of computing devices to enhance any family history research trip. The Cloud allows moving data seamlessly between devices and the ability to share with family and other researchers.

Registration Information

Online registration is available at the ISBGFH’s website: http://www.isbgfh.org.

If preferred, a mail-in registration form is provided. If you have any questions, please e-mail institute_director@isbgfh.org.

Monday, January 21, 2013

Findmypast.com.au adds 21 million new Irish Birth, Death & Marriage records


Findmypast.com.au just added 21 million new Irish Birth, Death and Marriage records (1800s – 1950s) to its already extensive collection of historical records.

“The addition of 21 million new birth, marriage and death records to our website means we will now have more than 60 million Irish records on our website, including census and parish records,” said Vicki Dawson, General Manager of findmypast.com.au. “There has never been a better time for people to explore and discover the details of the lives of their Irish ancestors.”

Births, deaths and marriages are central events in peoples’ lives and people researching their family history can use these to develop their family tree. Findmypast.com.au carries the most detailed and thorough collection of Irish records ever seen in one place – providing a fascinating insight into Ireland’s history and making Irish family research easier and more accessible than ever before.

Findmypast is a proud partner of The Gathering Ireland, a year-long celebration in 2013 of Ireland and all things Irish.

The Ireland birth, death and marriage collection is also available across all international findmypast sites as part of a World subscription

www.findmypast.ie
www.findmypast.co.uk
www.findmypast.com

For more information:

- Follow findmypast.com.au on twitter: http://twitter.com/findmypastau
- “Like” findmypast.com.au on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/findmypastAustralia for exclusive competitions and offers

Monday, March 12, 2012

The International Society for British Genealogy and Family History Announces Course Tracks and Instructors for 2012 British Institute

WESTMINSTER, Colo., 12 March 2011—The International Society for British Genealogy and Family History today announced its course lineup for this year’s British Institute. This weeklong, intensive institute will be held from 8–12 October in Salt Lake City. This year’s host hotel is the Radisson Downtown, located two blocks from the Family History Library. Registration is now open and class size is limited.

The Institute offers four tracks taught by expert genealogists:
  • Records and Strategies for Beginning English Research
    Judy Jones, AG, CG
    Join us as we learn about the records and strategies needed to begin research in England. This class will begin by teaching a strategy for 19th and 20th century research, then study the three basic records needed to find families in that time period. From there it will expand to those records needed to find supporting information, including maps, gazetteers, probate, and reading handwriting.
  • From Simple to Complex: Applying Genealogy’s Standard of Proof to Your Work
    Tom Jones, Ph.D., CG, CGL, FASG, FUGA, FNGS
    Genealogical statements and conclusions achieve credibility when they meet standards for proof. Participants will learn how to use widely accepted standards to measure their genealogical work’s accuracy and to assess the work of others.
  • British Military, Its Regiments and Records
    John Kitzmiller, II, FSG (England); FSA (Scot); AG, Heraldist – Heraldry Society of Canada (2nd level) & Heraldry Society of London (2nd level)
    Why take this course? The answer is many of the population were involved in these entities throughout time. There is a high probability that somewhere you have a military-connected ancestor. The British military course will cover a wide variety of records that will assist you in tracing your military ancestors. We will discuss the records of military personnel for the outlined time period which are centered (or held) at the regimental level. This means that one must know the regiment (pre-1881) to be able to trace an ancestor. Post-1881 is a bit different, in that there can be indices available that cover the time period as well as civil records which are critical as an additional locator record. Websites containing military records will also be discussed.
  • Advanced Methodology for Irish Research
    David Rencher, AG, CG, FIGRS, FUGA
    This course was first introduced in 2011 and will again focus on the methodologies needed for successful Irish research. New record sources and strategies will be introduced for 2012 with a review of best practices. Learn how to frame your tough Irish genealogical problems, develop a sound strategy and sharpen your analytical skills with these advanced methods. You’ll also enjoy the richness of the Irish collection of the Family History Library and explore some of the lesser known records of this vast resource, a must stop before leaving for Ireland.

“The Institute is in its 12th year and, as always, we design the program with the goal of helping students overcome the challenge of researching their British Isles from a distance,” said ISBGFH President Ann Wells. “We are excited to offer this panel of expert instructors and range of courses that would apply to beginner, intermediate, or advanced students.”

Registration Information

More detailed information on the institute can be found at the ISBGFH’s Web site http://www.isbgfh.org. You can register online, or print, fill out the application and mail to ISBGFH, PO Box 350459, Westminster, CO 80035-0459. If you have any questions, please e-mail admin@isbgfh.org. When registering at the Radisson Downtown Salt Lake, ask for the British Institute conference rate.

About The International Society for British Genealogy and Family History

The International Society for British Genealogy and Family History has been around a long time–longer than it takes to say the full name. Many of us who have been involved for years talk about “ISB” not only for convenience, but because the nickname suggests what the organization is—small, practical and friendly.

ISB got started in 1979 due to the efforts of several people who saw the need for an organization that would help genealogists tracing the origins of their British Isle emigrant ancestors. Thus it is no surprise that the members of ISB live all over North America and overseas.

The Society continues to evolve but it retains its original purpose. ISB is here to help members overcome the challenges of researching British Isles roots from a distance. See http://www.isbgfh.org for more information.

Wednesday, April 13, 2011

The International Society for British Genealogy and Family History Unveils Speakers for Upcoming British Institute

WESTMINSTER, Colo., 11 April, 2011—The International Society for British Genealogy and Family History is excited to announce its speakers for this year’s British Institute, to be held from 3–7 October in Salt Lake City. This year’s host hotel will be the Radisson Downtown, just a couple of blocks from the Family History Library. Registration is now open and class size is limited.

The Institute consists of three tracks:

- Barbara Baker, AG will offer Finding Records of Property Ownership in England. There is no national registry of deeds in England until after 1862 and Barbara’s course will cover various types of land and records and where to look for the them.

- John Kitzmiller, II, AG, FSA, (Scot), FSG (Eng.), will present The Amazing Honourable East India Company (HEIC). The HEIC was instrumental in making many a military officer or civil servant becoming quite wealthy during their tenure in the service. Learn the history of the HEIC, where to find the records and how to apply them to your research.

- David Rencher, AG, CG, FIGRS, FUGA, will present Genealogical Research in Ireland-Advanced Methodology. This course will include Strategies for a Solid Beginning, Catholic Strategies and Research, Scots-Irish Strategies, Mining the Evidence and Drawing Conclusions from the Evidence.

More detailed information can be found at the ISBGFH’s Web site http://www.isbgfh.org and you can register on-line, or print, fill out the application and mail to ISBGFH, PO Box 350459, Westminster, CO 80035-0459. If you have any questions, please send an e-mail to admin@isbgfh.org . When registering at the Radisson Downtown Salt Lake, ask for the British Institute conference rate.

About The International Society for British Genealogy and Family History

The International Society for British Genealogy and Family History has been around a long time–longer than it takes to say the full name. Many of us who have been involved for years talk about “ISB” not only for convenience, but because the nickname suggests what the organization is—small, practical and friendly.

ISB got started in 1979 due to the efforts of several people who saw the need for an organization that would help genealogists tracing the origins of their British Isle emigrant ancestors. Thus it is no surprise that the members of ISB live all over North America and overseas.

The Society continues to evolve but it retains its original purpose. ISB is here to help members overcome the challenges of researching British Isles roots from a distance. See http://www.isbgfh.org for more information.